Health

7:52am

Wed October 9, 2013
Health

Researcher looks for Alzheimer's diagnosis in speech patterns

Researchers hope recording voices of Alzheimer's patients will help lead to earlier detection of the disease.
License Attribution Some rights reserved by roland / Creative Commons License

A Binghamton researcher is launching a study that he hopes will help with early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. David Shaffer is looking for Alzheimer’s patients so he can record their voices. Shaffer believes if he can get enough samples and enough funding, he could pinpoint how a deteriorating brain reveals itself in speech patterns, because so much of the brain is involved in speaking.

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7:01pm

Sun October 6, 2013
Health

Despite wide availability, many still not taking advantage of flu shot

itsv Flickr

Fall brings many great things—the leaves begin to change color, apples are ripe for the picking — but on the other end of the spectrum, fall also brings something that nobody looks forward to — flu season. A simple flu shot, which is easy to get, may equip people with all the immunity tools they need to fight off the flu. But surprisingly, the majority of people don’t take advantage of it.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Joseph Bresee discusses how the flu shot works and why people should get it. Dr. Bresee is the chief of the Epidemiology and Prevention Branch at the Centers for Disease Control, and helps create the yearly vaccine he believes more people should be receiving.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Joseph Bresee.

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7:00pm

Sun October 6, 2013
Health

Coping with empty nest syndrome

Credit Mandy Jansen / Flickr

Leaving home for the first time can be very stressful on a child. Whether they are moving away to college or relocating for a job, the process is one of change and readjustment. But the parents who raised that child often have an even more difficult time adjusting -- resulting in what is known as empty nest syndrome.

This week on Take Care, Kimberly Key talks about why empty nest syndrome develops, and how it can be used as a motivator to positively turn someone’s life around. Key is a psychotherapist and a nationally certified counselor who specializes in holistic human development and the founder of Encompass Work & Family, which helps people evolve through life’s stages.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Kimberly Key.

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8:34am

Sat October 5, 2013
Technology

Concern raised over robotic surgery complications

The use of surgical robots has increased by more than 400 percent in the United States over the past six years. But a recent study published in the Journal for Healthcare Quality suggests that there’s underreporting of complications resulting from robotic surgeries.

Robot-assisted surgery is a minimally-invasive method in which a small incision allows remote-controlled instruments to be inserted into the body. The instruments are then controlled during the procedure by the surgeon using a console.

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7:11am

Fri October 4, 2013
Health

Unpredictability of flu season should be motivation to get shot

paulswansen Flickr

Every year at this time, public health officials encourage Americans to get a flu vaccine, but the majority of people choose not to have a flu shot. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Dr. Joseph Bresee of the Centers for Disease Control about how the vaccine works to prevent the flu, and why the CDC recommends it.

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8:32am

Thu October 3, 2013
Health

Whooping cough cases rise as more parents opt out of vaccine

A graph shows the number of cases of whooping cough in five area counties.
Kate O'Connell/Innovation Trail

The number of parents opting out of having their kids vaccinated against whooping cough, also known as pertussis, is on the rise, according to a recent report. This is resulting in an increase in whooping cough cases statewide.

In 2012, New York state saw the highest number of whooping cough cases in decades, with more than 3,000 cases confirmed statewide.

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7:35am

Wed October 2, 2013
Health

New Yorkers flock to register on state health exchange

Willie Terrell gets advice from a navigator about what health care coverage plans are available.
Ellen Abbott/WRVO

The health exchanges that are part of the Affordable Care Act opened Tuesday, and in short order there were two million hits on the New York state website that's selling health insurance policies. People who weren't turning to the website in central New York were lining up to get face-to-face information on how to choose a plan.

Willie Terrell, of Syracuse, has been waiting for this day since he lost his health insurance a year ago.

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9:04am

Tue October 1, 2013
Health

How will the Affordable Care Act affect you?

The federal health law's individual marketplaces have started. In New York nearly all Americans will be required to have health insurance starting January 1, 2014, or else they will be liable for a tax penalty. There is considerable confusion about the law. Some people aren't sure if they qualify and they have no clear idea of how much insurance might cost. 

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7:46am

Tue October 1, 2013
Health

New York's health exchange opens for business

This graphic shows customers the four tiers, and what costs are covered by the member.
Excellus BlueCross BlueShield

New York State of Health, the marketplace exchange that will let New Yorkers choose health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, is open for business starting Tuesday. The state has plenty of help available for anyone who's taking the jump into these historic waters.

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8:01am

Mon September 30, 2013
Health

Affordable Care Act still poses concerns for small businesses, doctors

New York is one of the states that will be offering insurance for the Affordable Care Act (ACA) through state health exchanges. What is arguably the landmark feature of the law also known as Obamacare, the registration springs into action tomorrow when New Yorkers can begin shopping and buying health plans through a marketplace called New York State of Health. Implementation of the plan has had its bumps and bruises, but New York is ready to go, even if lingering concerns in certain sectors remain.

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7:01pm

Sun September 29, 2013
Health

Compulsive "hoarding" caused by more than just nostalgia

Mark Knobil Flickr

Everyone has something they can’t quite let go, whether it’s all the back issues of their favorite magazine or their favorite sweater from 2003 that no longer fits. What happens when this feeling spreads to many other items as well, to the point where it starts to not only compromise your home, but your daily life as well.

The recent popularity of the A&E reality television show Hoarders has opened up a national conversation on the topic of compulsive hoarding, which many are starting to realize can be a serious psychological issue rather than just a strong feeling of nostalgia towards physical items.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Robin Zasio talks about compulsive hoarding and the treatment process for it. Dr. Zasio is a clinical psychologist that specializes in anxiety disorders. She has appeared on Hoarders, and is the author of the book “The Hoarder in You: How to Live a Happier, Healthier, and Uncluttered Life.”

 Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Robin Zasio.

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7:00pm

Sun September 29, 2013
Health

Researcher hopes "chemo brain" study can help cancer patients

Velcade chemo treatment.
tyfn Flickr

Chemotherapy is one of the best known forms of cancer treatment, and while often effective, it can leave behind a number of side effects, like hair loss and nausea. Some who have undergone chemotherapy also have claimed to have felt foggy, forgetful and not as sharp as they were before the treatment. Largely ignored by the medical community in the past, this symptom, which is referred to as “chemo brain,” is finally starting to come to the forefront in medical research.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Michelle Janelsins talks about the research she and others are now conducting on chemo brain. Janelsins is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Surgery, Cancer Control at the University of Rochester School of Medicine, where she got her PhD.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Janelsins.

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3:10pm

Fri September 27, 2013
Mental Health

Schumer wants better VA, police coordination on mental health

New York Democratic Sen. Charles Schumer, right, wants the Veterans Affairs medical network to better handle mental health issues.
Ryan Delaney WRVO

Sen. Charles Schumer is calling for more coordination between police and Veterans Affairs medical centers to treat veterans with mental health problems.

Schumer, a Democrat from New York, wants the VA to investigate its handling of mentally ill veterans in the wake of a veteran’s shooting spree. Police say Navy veteran Aaron Alexis killed 12 people on a base in Washington D.C. last week.

Schumer says ineffective communication between police and military allowed Alexis to not be treated.

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7:12am

Fri September 27, 2013
Health

Suicide prevention app aims to reach wider population

The free Safety Plan iPhone app is designed to help people cope with suicidal thoughts.
New York state Office of Mental Health

New York state has one of the lowest suicide rates in the nation. But, that still translated into more than 1,600 deaths in 2011, and upstate rural communities have been identified as the most at risk.

Now the state Office of Mental Health has released a free iPhone app designed to extend the reach of their suicide prevention initiative.

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6:31am

Fri September 27, 2013
Health

New study hopes to unlock the secret to "chemo brain"

Chemotherapy can cause many side effects like hair loss and nausea. But for years, many cancer patients have said it causes something else, forgetfulness and memory loss, or what cancer survivors call "chemo brain." Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Michelle Janelsins of the University of Rochester, who is leading a research study into chemotherapy's effects on cognitive function.

Lorraine Rapp: The term “chemo brain” is relatively new. How do researchers and medical doctors actually define that term?

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4:05pm

Tue September 24, 2013
Health

Geriatric ER at Upstate University Hospital helping more seniors

Since it opened in July, the geriatric emergency room, known as GEM Care, at the Upstate University Hospital Community Campus is getting more seniors in the emergency department compared to a year ago.

GEM Care Director Dr. Jaime Ciacco said the new emergency department has achieved the goal of having fewer seniors admitted to the hospital after those visits.

He also said one thing they are finding at the facility, is that they're fixing the small things that can often be overlooked in a senior's health care.

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4:00pm

Tue September 24, 2013
Health

Schumer, Kelly call on Congress to approve newborn screening bill

Senator Charles Schumer and former NFL player Jim Kelly are urging lawmakers to extend federal funding for a newborn screening program that is scheduled to end at the end of September.

"At birth, nearly all of New York's quarter million newborns each year, and about 4 million babies in the U.S., are screened for a variety of disorders and it's done through a simple heel prick. One little drop of blood they can determine all this. The blood tests provide early detection and treatment for more than 40 congenital disorders."

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7:16am

Mon September 23, 2013
Health

Syracuse's Golisano Hospital using laser technology to treat brain tumors

Dr. Zulma Tovar-Spinoza with two-year-old Arianna Failla and her mother, Jennifer Failla.
Ellen Abbott/WRVO

Syracuse's Upstate Golisano Children's Hospital is the first in the nation using laser technology to treat a rare, genetic disease with a multi-staged approach. The new use of laser ablation technology has changed the lives of families with children suffering from tuberous sclerosis in central New York.

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7:01pm

Sun September 22, 2013
Health

Year-round youth sports mean more injuries

wynner3 Flickr

Any casual sports fan knows that it’s football season. Just look at any high school on a Friday night or in the living rooms of Americans everywhere on Sundays. If you ask a child athlete when football season is though, their response may not be fall—it may be “all year.”

Year-round playing of a single sport is just one of the trends in youth athletics which have helped lead to an increase in youth sports injuries, according to Dr. Pietro Tonino. Dr. Tonino is Chief of Sports Medicine at the Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine in Chicago, and a leading expert on youth sports injuries.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Pietro Tonino.

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7:00pm

Sun September 22, 2013
Health

Cherries & chocolate -- not just for dessert

D. H. Wright Flickr

What do strawberries, dark chocolate and cherries all have in common? If you guessed that they all can help with your health and wellness, you are right. If you guessed that they are all delicious, we’ll give you that too.

This week on Take Care, a conversation about folk remedies with Denise Foley, an award-winning health journalist and the Contributing Executive Editor at Prevention magazine. She's the co-author of "‪The Doctors Book of Home Remedies for Children: ‪From Allergies and Animal Bites to Toothache and TV Addiction, Hundreds of Doctor-Proven Techniques and Tips to Care for Your Kid."

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Denise Foley.

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8:34am

Sat September 21, 2013
Health

New study links excessive copper intake to Alzheimer's

Copper is an important aspect of proper nutrition, and vital for us to maintain a healthy body. But a group of upstate New York researchers have concluded too much copper in our diet could be a contributing factor in the onset and progression of Alzheimer’s disease.

Tap water coming through copper pipes, fruits, vegetables, red meat and nuts; these are all sources of copper that we consume on a daily basis.

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5:45am

Fri September 20, 2013
Health

The changing culture of youth sports

With children starting to play sports at younger ages and playing their sports year-round, the chance they are going to get injured is on the rise. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," recently spoke with Dr. Pietro Tonino, the chief of sports medicine at Loyola University in Chicago, about why these injuries are occurring and how to prevent them.

Lorraine Rapp: How has youth sports changed over the years?

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7:15am

Thu September 19, 2013
Health

New York prepares to open Affordable Care Act health exchange

New York's health exchange will soon open, but New Yorkers still have questions.
Ellen Abbott/WRVO

In less than two weeks, the health exchanges that are an integral part of the Affordable Care Act will go into business in New York state, but officials are already starting to hear from residents who want to know how this will affect their health care.

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7:01pm

Sun September 15, 2013
Health

Melanoma treatment breakthroughs provide hope for those in advanced stages of disease

Melanoma cancer cells.
Credit Oscar Rohena / Flickr

With early detection and treatment, melanoma is nearly 100 percent curable.  But for patients with advanced stages of melanoma, this skin cancer is often regarded as one of the most deadly forms of cancer. Now, new advances in treatment therapies have provided dramatic improvements for those whose melanoma has spread.

This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Dr. Lynn Schuchter, chief of hematology-oncology at the University of Pennsylvania’s Abramson Cancer Center, about how melanoma is diagnosed and the variety of treatments now available.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Lynn Schuchter.

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7:00pm

Sun September 15, 2013
Health

Dads vs. cads: The biological reasons for who wins a woman's heart

zoetnet Flickr

Is love blind, or is it like a biological version of The Bachelorette? How does a woman pick her dream guy? Is it completely up to her, or is there a point in which her biological instincts take over? This week on Take Care, clinical psychologist and journalist Dr. Vinita Mehta discusses the issue most men are afraid to ask about -- how women pick their mates.

Click "Read More" to hear our interview with Dr. Vinita Mehta.

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6:57am

Fri September 13, 2013
Health

County nursing homes at risk statewide

Some rights reserved by Cast a Line

The vast majority of the state’s county-run nursing homes are losing money and facing a shaky financial future, according to the findings of a new study by the Center for Governmental Research.

As a result, most counties are looking for alternatives to deal with an aging population.

In recent years, six New York counties have sold or closed their nursing homes. As costs continue to rise, many others are considering privatization as a solution.

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5:34am

Fri September 13, 2013
Health

Melanoma treatments advancing rapidly

Lorraine Rapp: If you would, walk us through what happens when a person finds out their mole or growth is malignant. Who makes that diagnosis and what are the first steps taken once a person gets the diagnosis.

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7:01pm

Sun September 8, 2013
Health

Celiac disease: how it's diagnosed and treated

SliceOfChic Flickr

Celiac disease is a tricky medical disorder. When left untreated, up to 300 different symptoms can occur, and the elapsed time from the onset of those symptoms to an actual diagnosis averages about ten years.

Nancy Lapid, the managing editor for Reuters Health, and Dr. Daniel Leffler, the director of clinical research at the Celiac Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, both spoke with “Take Care” about this serious disease, which many people have only heard of in recent years.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Nancy Lapid and Dr. Daniel Leffler.

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7:00pm

Sun September 8, 2013
Health

Does an apple a day really keep the doctor away?

Kevin Maloney

We’ve all been told that an apple a day keeps the doctor away. In the over 150 years that saying has been around, many have taken it as common health knowledge. But are apples really that good for you?

According to Joan Rogus, a registered dietician from central New York, the reason the saying has stood the test of time is because of the truth behind it. When asked what health benefits an apple can provide, Joan believes an easier question to answer would be, “What doesn’t an apple do for us?”

Click "Read More" to hear our interview with Joan Rogus.

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7:31am

Fri September 6, 2013
Health

Auburn Community Hospital's VA outpatient clinic receives contract extension

Jordan Alexander shows onlookers how the new Telehealth technology links Auburn's VA outpatient clinic to Syracuse.
Gino Geruntino/WRVO

Auburn Community Hospital has renewed its contract with the Department of Veterans Affairs for another five years. The contract, which was signed in July, allows the hospital to continue providing health care and specialty referral services to more than 1,400 veterans in and around Cayuga County through its VA Community Based Outpatient Clinic.

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