Health

7:12am

Fri September 27, 2013
Health

Suicide prevention app aims to reach wider population

The free Safety Plan iPhone app is designed to help people cope with suicidal thoughts.
New York state Office of Mental Health

New York state has one of the lowest suicide rates in the nation. But, that still translated into more than 1,600 deaths in 2011, and upstate rural communities have been identified as the most at risk.

Now the state Office of Mental Health has released a free iPhone app designed to extend the reach of their suicide prevention initiative.

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6:31am

Fri September 27, 2013
Health

New study hopes to unlock the secret to "chemo brain"

Chemotherapy can cause many side effects like hair loss and nausea. But for years, many cancer patients have said it causes something else, forgetfulness and memory loss, or what cancer survivors call "chemo brain." Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show Take Care, recently spoke with Michelle Janelsins of the University of Rochester, who is leading a research study into chemotherapy's effects on cognitive function.

Lorraine Rapp: The term “chemo brain” is relatively new. How do researchers and medical doctors actually define that term?

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4:05pm

Tue September 24, 2013
Health

Geriatric ER at Upstate University Hospital helping more seniors

Since it opened in July, the geriatric emergency room, known as GEM Care, at the Upstate University Hospital Community Campus is getting more seniors in the emergency department compared to a year ago.

GEM Care Director Dr. Jaime Ciacco said the new emergency department has achieved the goal of having fewer seniors admitted to the hospital after those visits.

He also said one thing they are finding at the facility, is that they're fixing the small things that can often be overlooked in a senior's health care.

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4:00pm

Tue September 24, 2013
Health

Schumer, Kelly call on Congress to approve newborn screening bill

Senator Charles Schumer and former NFL player Jim Kelly are urging lawmakers to extend federal funding for a newborn screening program that is scheduled to end at the end of September.

"At birth, nearly all of New York's quarter million newborns each year, and about 4 million babies in the U.S., are screened for a variety of disorders and it's done through a simple heel prick. One little drop of blood they can determine all this. The blood tests provide early detection and treatment for more than 40 congenital disorders."

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7:16am

Mon September 23, 2013
Health

Syracuse's Golisano Hospital using laser technology to treat brain tumors

Dr. Zulma Tovar-Spinoza with two-year-old Arianna Failla and her mother, Jennifer Failla.
Ellen Abbott/WRVO

Syracuse's Upstate Golisano Children's Hospital is the first in the nation using laser technology to treat a rare, genetic disease with a multi-staged approach. The new use of laser ablation technology has changed the lives of families with children suffering from tuberous sclerosis in central New York.

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7:01pm

Sun September 22, 2013
Health

Year-round youth sports mean more injuries

wynner3 Flickr

Any casual sports fan knows that it’s football season. Just look at any high school on a Friday night or in the living rooms of Americans everywhere on Sundays. If you ask a child athlete when football season is though, their response may not be fall—it may be “all year.”

Year-round playing of a single sport is just one of the trends in youth athletics which have helped lead to an increase in youth sports injuries, according to Dr. Pietro Tonino. Dr. Tonino is Chief of Sports Medicine at the Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine in Chicago, and a leading expert on youth sports injuries.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Pietro Tonino.

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7:00pm

Sun September 22, 2013
Health

Cherries & chocolate -- not just for dessert

D. H. Wright Flickr

What do strawberries, dark chocolate and cherries all have in common? If you guessed that they all can help with your health and wellness, you are right. If you guessed that they are all delicious, we’ll give you that too.

This week on Take Care, a conversation about folk remedies with Denise Foley, an award-winning health journalist and the Contributing Executive Editor at Prevention magazine. She's the co-author of "‪The Doctors Book of Home Remedies for Children: ‪From Allergies and Animal Bites to Toothache and TV Addiction, Hundreds of Doctor-Proven Techniques and Tips to Care for Your Kid."

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Denise Foley.

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8:34am

Sat September 21, 2013
Health

New study links excessive copper intake to Alzheimer's

Copper is an important aspect of proper nutrition, and vital for us to maintain a healthy body. But a group of upstate New York researchers have concluded too much copper in our diet could be a contributing factor in the onset and progression of Alzheimer’s disease.

Tap water coming through copper pipes, fruits, vegetables, red meat and nuts; these are all sources of copper that we consume on a daily basis.

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5:45am

Fri September 20, 2013
Health

The changing culture of youth sports

With children starting to play sports at younger ages and playing their sports year-round, the chance they are going to get injured is on the rise. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," recently spoke with Dr. Pietro Tonino, the chief of sports medicine at Loyola University in Chicago, about why these injuries are occurring and how to prevent them.

Lorraine Rapp: How has youth sports changed over the years?

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7:15am

Thu September 19, 2013
Health

New York prepares to open Affordable Care Act health exchange

New York's health exchange will soon open, but New Yorkers still have questions.
Ellen Abbott/WRVO

In less than two weeks, the health exchanges that are an integral part of the Affordable Care Act will go into business in New York state, but officials are already starting to hear from residents who want to know how this will affect their health care.

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7:01pm

Sun September 15, 2013
Health

Melanoma treatment breakthroughs provide hope for those in advanced stages of disease

Melanoma cancer cells.
Credit Oscar Rohena / Flickr

With early detection and treatment, melanoma is nearly 100 percent curable.  But for patients with advanced stages of melanoma, this skin cancer is often regarded as one of the most deadly forms of cancer. Now, new advances in treatment therapies have provided dramatic improvements for those whose melanoma has spread.

This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Dr. Lynn Schuchter, chief of hematology-oncology at the University of Pennsylvania’s Abramson Cancer Center, about how melanoma is diagnosed and the variety of treatments now available.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Lynn Schuchter.

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7:00pm

Sun September 15, 2013
Health

Dads vs. cads: The biological reasons for who wins a woman's heart

zoetnet Flickr

Is love blind, or is it like a biological version of The Bachelorette? How does a woman pick her dream guy? Is it completely up to her, or is there a point in which her biological instincts take over? This week on Take Care, clinical psychologist and journalist Dr. Vinita Mehta discusses the issue most men are afraid to ask about -- how women pick their mates.

Click "Read More" to hear our interview with Dr. Vinita Mehta.

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6:57am

Fri September 13, 2013
Health

County nursing homes at risk statewide

Some rights reserved by Cast a Line

The vast majority of the state’s county-run nursing homes are losing money and facing a shaky financial future, according to the findings of a new study by the Center for Governmental Research.

As a result, most counties are looking for alternatives to deal with an aging population.

In recent years, six New York counties have sold or closed their nursing homes. As costs continue to rise, many others are considering privatization as a solution.

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5:34am

Fri September 13, 2013
Health

Melanoma treatments advancing rapidly

Lorraine Rapp: If you would, walk us through what happens when a person finds out their mole or growth is malignant. Who makes that diagnosis and what are the first steps taken once a person gets the diagnosis.

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7:01pm

Sun September 8, 2013
Health

Celiac disease: how it's diagnosed and treated

SliceOfChic Flickr

Celiac disease is a tricky medical disorder. When left untreated, up to 300 different symptoms can occur, and the elapsed time from the onset of those symptoms to an actual diagnosis averages about ten years.

Nancy Lapid, the managing editor for Reuters Health, and Dr. Daniel Leffler, the director of clinical research at the Celiac Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, both spoke with “Take Care” about this serious disease, which many people have only heard of in recent years.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Nancy Lapid and Dr. Daniel Leffler.

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7:00pm

Sun September 8, 2013
Health

Does an apple a day really keep the doctor away?

Kevin Maloney

We’ve all been told that an apple a day keeps the doctor away. In the over 150 years that saying has been around, many have taken it as common health knowledge. But are apples really that good for you?

According to Joan Rogus, a registered dietician from central New York, the reason the saying has stood the test of time is because of the truth behind it. When asked what health benefits an apple can provide, Joan believes an easier question to answer would be, “What doesn’t an apple do for us?”

Click "Read More" to hear our interview with Joan Rogus.

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7:31am

Fri September 6, 2013
Health

Auburn Community Hospital's VA outpatient clinic receives contract extension

Jordan Alexander shows onlookers how the new Telehealth technology links Auburn's VA outpatient clinic to Syracuse.
Gino Geruntino/WRVO

Auburn Community Hospital has renewed its contract with the Department of Veterans Affairs for another five years. The contract, which was signed in July, allows the hospital to continue providing health care and specialty referral services to more than 1,400 veterans in and around Cayuga County through its VA Community Based Outpatient Clinic.

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5:34am

Fri September 6, 2013
Health

Celiac disease -- more than gluten intolerance

Gluten intolerance has recently become a popular nutritional catch phrase. But behind the hype of the many gluten-free products currently on the market is an actual disorder called celiac disease. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” recently spoke with Dr. Daniel Leffler, who is the director of the Celiac Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston about how the disease is diagnosed and treated.

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4:09pm

Thu September 5, 2013
Health

Digital tools helping to keep off the "Freshman 15"

Jeremy Wilburn Creative Commons License

It used to be the "Freshman 5." Now it’s the "Freshman 15." But students who started college this fall now have new digital tools available to help them stay healthy.

On-demand digital health information being provided by colleges seems to be helping control those extra pounds undergraduates can put on.

Dietician Colleen Dour evaluated the effectiveness of a computer-based wellness program in a study for Syracuse University. The program focuses on wellness and body image, rather than dieting.

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5:59am

Tue September 3, 2013
Health

Mobile app could track foodborne illness with a single tweet

Shawn Campbell/flickr

Upstate researchers have found a way predict the likelihood of getting sick after visiting a particular restaurant. The system is called Nemesis and monitors tweets made by restaurant patrons on the popular social media website, Twitter. It then detects likely cases of foodborne illness in close to real-time.

Many people tweet on devices that are GPS enabled, and Nemesis uses this to figure out which restaurant they ate at. It continues to track their tweets for 72 hours after a restaurant visit, to detect whether or not they’ve become ill.

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8:34am

Sun September 1, 2013
Health

How should you make the medicine go down?

e-MagineArt.com Flickr

Capsules, chewable tablets, gel tabs -- Over-the-counter medications now come in so many different formulations, it's difficult to figure out what to take. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen....hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," Spoke to Dr. Lindsay McNair, a pharmaceutical physician and professor at the Boston University School of Public Health, about how to best take your medicine.

Lorraine Rapp: There are so many forms that these over the counter medications come in. What was behind their development?

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7:01pm

Sun August 25, 2013
Health

The I-STOP law: an assemblyman's push to solve a big problem

VCU Libraries Flickr

Prescription drugs can be helpful to those that need them. But for others they can be dangerous or even deadly. This week on “Take Care,” we talk to New York State Assemblyman Michael Cusick, the lead sponsor behind a piece of legislation called I-STOP, or Internet System for Tracking Over Prescribing, which is intended to serve as a national model to end prescription painkiller abuse.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Assemblyman Cusick.

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7:00pm

Sun August 25, 2013
Health

The I-STOP law: a doctor worries for his patients

Credit Shawn Honnick / Flickr

The new I-STOP law passed by the New York State Legislature is aimed at reducing the amount of overdoses on prescription painkillers; although some groups worry it might do more harm than good. This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Dr. Joseph Navone, president of the Upstate New York Society of Medical Oncology and Hematology, a group that specializes in pain and pain relief for patients.

Click 'Read More' to hear out interview with Dr. Joseph Navone.

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7:01pm

Sun August 18, 2013
Health

Measure, manage & motivate: how fitness trackers can help

bfishadow/flickr

Do you ever wonder how many steps you’ve taken in a day or how many calories you’ve burned off on the treadmill? Do you wish you could have someone make sure you get out of bed and to the gym?  This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Jennifer Jolly, an Emmy-winning consumer technology journalist and host of USA Today’s “TechNow,” about the newest trend in working out – fitness trackers.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Jennifer Jolly.

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7:00pm

Sun August 18, 2013
Health

How anticipation and reward make the brain love music

MatthiasRhomberg/Flickr

It’s hard to make it through the day without listening to music whether it is on the radio, a computer or a portable mp3 player. But why do we get so happy listening to our favorite song, singing in the shower or even learning to play a musical instrument? This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Dr. Robert Zatorre, a professor of neuroscience at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital at McGill University, on why music makes our brains sing.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Robert Zatorre.

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5:34am

Fri August 16, 2013
Health

Why 'music makes our brain sing'

For many people, music evokes an emotional response of pleasure. Neurologist Dr. Robert Zatorre, of McGill University in Montreal, has studied why our favorite songs cause those feelings. He recently wrote about his findings in a New York Times article "Why Music Makes our Brain Sing." And, as Dr. Zatorre told Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," the answer lies in the way the brain processes anticipation and reward.

Lorraine Rapp:  What has your research revealed as to why music affects us the way it does?

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6:47am

Tue August 13, 2013
Health

West Nile Encephalitis confirmed in horse in Oneida County

A yearling horse in the town of Vernon has tested positive for West Nile Encephalitis, despite the fact the county has not yet discovered the virus in any mosquito pools during its summer monitoring.

The horse eventually became paralyzed in its hind legs, but was treated by veterinarians and has shown improvement. Ken Fanelli, a spokesman with the Oneida County Health Department, says it can be difficult to keep horses from contracting West Nile Virus.

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5:16am

Mon August 12, 2013
Health

Upstate hospitals get mixed reviews in 2013 report card

Crouse Hospital in Syracuse received poor marks for six cases of leaving an object in a patient during surgery.
der_krampus via Flickr

Four hospitals in upstate New York have been given poor grades and put on a "watch list" by a private health care watchdog group.

The Niagara Health Quality Coalition has been ranking New York state’s best and worst hospitals for a decade, and the latest report card released on Sunday shows a mixed bag in upstate New York.

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7:01pm

Sun August 11, 2013
Health

The 'big mistake' of painkillers

Peacock Parables Flickr

They’re supposed to kill pain, but they could be hurting patients more than helping them. This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Barry Meier, a New York Times reporter and the author of A World of Hurt: Fixing Pain Medicine’s Biggest Mistake, about painkillers in the medical field.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Barry Meier.

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7:00pm

Sun August 11, 2013
Health

Hearing loss: likely, but not inevitable

Eknath Gomphotherium Flickr

As we get older, we can lose our hair, our eyesight, but the affect aging has on our hearing can be less apparent. And how can we stop hearing loss? This week on “Take Care,” we talk to Dr. Joseph Pellegrino, assistant professor and director of audiology at the Gebbie Hearing Clinic at Syracuse University, about age-related hearing disorders.

Click "Read More" to hear our interview with Dr. Pellegrino.

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