health

6:26pm

Fri April 11, 2014
Health

This week: preventing amputations in people with diabetes and more

For people with diabetes, monitoring foot health is as important as tracking sugar levels, blood pressure and kidney function.

"If they don't have good blood supply to their foot, you can give all of the antibiotics that you want, but the antibiotics go in the blood, and the blood can't get to the foot," says Dr. Palma Shaw, a vascular surgeon at Upstate.

We'll hear how diabetes can lead to amputation and why regular podiatry appointments are suggested.

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1:18pm

Fri April 11, 2014
Health

Onondaga County: Dr. Morrow's resignation was "premature"

Dr. Cynthia Morrow, former commissioner of the Onondaga County Health Department, speaking to the county legislature's health committee.
Ryan Delaney WRVO

Onondaga County's deputy executive for human services says it was "premature" for the county's health commissioner to resign.

Dr. Cynthia Morrow resigned from her role as the county's top health expert last week over the county executive's plans to reorganize child and maternal health services within county departments.

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4:20pm

Thu April 10, 2014
Health

Final enrollment day was busiest for state's health care exchange

March 31 was the busiest day for New York's new health insurance marketplace. It was also the final day of the six month open enrollment period.

Almost 470,000 people visited the site and 39,000 signed up on that last day, according to the state's exchange, to bring the total to 926,000 enrolled.

Those newly covered signed up for a combination of the expanded federal Medicaid program, Child Health Plus, or a private provider.

The exchange is crediting its early success in enrollment with a functioning website, something the federal exchange was plagued with.

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10:48am

Mon April 7, 2014
Health

St. Joseph's Hospital responds to allegation of patient abuse

St. Joseph's hospital on Syracuse's north side.
Ryan Delaney WRVO

Updated, 3:40 p.m.:

St. Joseph's Hospital is responding to allegations of misbehavior against a former doctor, saying it reacted quickly and thoroughly.

The hospital said it became aware of complaints involving inappropriate actions and vulgar language -- reportedly involving the slapping of sedated patients -- in its operating rooms in December.

The hospital faces sanctions and disciplinary actions over the charges, stemming from a federal investigation.

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7:01pm

Sun April 6, 2014
Health

More ADHD diagnoses mean more kids on medication

ADHD och ADD

Some kids have short attention spans, and can act hyper or impulsive. But do these kids all need to be medicated? Today, 3.5 million children in the United States are on medication for Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder.

This week on Take Care, Alan Schwarz, a writer for The New York Times who has reported extensively on ADHD, discusses the rise of ADHD diagnoses in children. According to the Centers for Disease Control, 11 percent of school-aged children have been diagnosed with ADHD, but according to Schwarz, some of them may be misdiagnoses.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Alan Schwarz.

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11:41am

Fri April 4, 2014
Health

This week: e-cigarettes, drug dependence during pregnancy and more

Health authorities are very aware of the increasing popularity of electronic cigarettes. Some think these tobacco products lure teens and young adults to the habit of smoking not only e-cigarettes but traditional cigarettes as well.

The number of high school students using e-cigarettes has doubled from 2011 to 2012. Dr. Leslie Kohman, the medical director of the Upstate Cancer Center, explains some dangers of these devices.

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5:34am

Fri April 4, 2014
Health

ADHD diagnoses rising, potentially misdiagnosed often

Diagnoses of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder have been rising for the past 20 years. Today, 3.5 million children in the United States are on medication for the disorder. This week on WRVO’s health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Alan Schwarz, a writer for The New York Times who has reported extensively on ADHD. Schwarz discusses the rise of ADHD and how it is likely being over diagnosed.

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10:52am

Thu April 3, 2014
Health

Onondaga County health commissioner resigns

The head of Onondaga County's health department, Dr. Cynthia Morrow, has suddenly resigned.

Morrow's resignation is effective immediately, according to Ben Dublin, a spokesman for County Executive Joanie Mahoney.

Mahoney accepted the resignation today, Dublin said.

Deputy Commissioner Michele Mignano has been appointed in her place for the interim and Dr. Morrow will stay on for a few weeks to help with the transition, Dublin said.

The county executive released this statement: 

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7:01pm

Sun March 30, 2014
Health

Study shows equal marriages lack sexual spark

Credit Ika Ink / Flickr

If you share the chores with your spouse, the two of you have what psychologists call a "peer marriage,” an egalitarian partnership. Maybe the husband cooks, vacuums, and loads the dishwasher, and you genuinely enjoy each other's company. But what about your sex life? The answer may reveal an unexpected outcome of modern marriage.

This week on Take Care, Lori Gottlieb, psychotherapist and author of The New York Times article “Does a More Equal Marriage Mean Less Sex?” discusses how equality in marriage can impact a couple’s sex life. Her article has triggered a national debate on why peer marriages seem to have lost that sexual spark. Gottlieb is the author of The New York Times bestseller "Marry Him: The Case for Settling for Mr. Good Enough" and three other books, as well as a contributing editor for The Atlantic.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Lori Gottlieb.

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5:39am

Fri March 28, 2014
Health

For those over 60, vaccine is best prevention for shingles

It's one of the most painful syndromes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say one in three Americans will get it eventually and those over 60 should be vaccinated. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Pritish Tosh, assistant professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic,  about shingles and how to prevent it.

Lorraine Rapp: Let’s start at the beginning so we have a full understanding.  Exactly what is shingles?

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7:01pm

Sun March 23, 2014
Health

What's the future for the nutrition facts label?

Dan Domme Flickr

The Food and Drug Administration is changing the nutrition facts label for the first time since the 1990s. The changes will update the current labels, which have serving sizes that seem too small to many Americans and no prominence placed on the calories.

This week on Take Care, Tracy Fox, president of Food, Nutrition & Policy Consultants in Washington D.C., discusses the current nutrition facts label and how it may be upgraded.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Tracy Fox.

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11:22am

Fri March 21, 2014
Health

This week: a mysterious illness and a story of dramatic weight loss

Cristina Pope

This week, Dr. Leonard Weiner explains a mysterious polio-like illness affecting children in California.

Plus, Cristina Pope weighed nearly 250 pounds when she decided to get serious about losing weight. Within a year she shed more than 100 pounds by carefully watching her nutrition intake and working out regularly. Now, almost two years later, she's kept the weight off.

We'll share her secrets to success, which include exercising in a variety of ways and eating plenty of vegetables.

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5:34am

Fri March 21, 2014
Health

Nutrition facts label will be changing

The familiar nutrition label you see on every food and drink you buy will be changing. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Tracy Fox, president of Food, Nutrition & Policy Consultants in Washington D.C.  Fox discusses the current nutrition label and what changes might be coming.

Lorraine Rapp: I wondered if you would talk about how effective these labels have been in helping consumers make more informed decisions? Overall has the program been effective?

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7:01pm

Sun March 16, 2014
Health

Quench your thirst for knowledge about water consumption

Vassilis Online Flickr

We hear all sorts of recommendations when it comes to drinking water: drink 6-8 glasses of water a day, drink fluids when you have a cold and drink still water instead of flavored water or soda. All this advice is enough to make your head spin -- and your bladder swim.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Stanley Goldfarb discusses some common misconceptions about water consumption in part two of his interview. Goldfarb is a professor of medicine at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. He has a specialty in renal electrolyte and hypertension, and is a leading expert in the topic of water consumption.

Click 'Read More' to hear the second part of our interview with Dr. Goldfarb.

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10:07am

Fri March 14, 2014
Health

This week: how lubricants affect fertility

Kazim Chohan, PhD
Credit Upstate University Hospital

Couples trying to conceive may be surprised to learn that many sexual lubricants act as spermicides, reducing their changes of pregnancy.

Several commercial products and household oils are harmful to sperm and can slow the movement of sperm, according to a study conducted through the andrology laboratory at Upstate Medical University. We'll discuss the study and it's implications with the director of andrology services, Kazim Chohan, and Dr. Renee Mestad.

Then, Dr. Antonia Culebras explains how to reduce stroke risk for people with irregular heartbeats.

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5:38am

Fri March 14, 2014
Health

Myths about water consumption debunked

Some rights reserved by BaronBrian

There are many theories about water consumption: but are they true? Is carbonated water as healthy as still water? Should you drink more fluids when you have a cold ? This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen,  speak with Dr. Stanley Goldfarb,  professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.  Goldfarb debunks some of the myths about drinking water in part two of his interview.

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8:32am

Sat March 8, 2014
Environment

Who is making sure school buildings are health environments?

A new book is shining a spotlight on the environmental issues within our nation’s schools.

"Toxic Schoolhouse," is an anthology that raises a number of issues including the absence of oversight of schools by the Environmental Protection Agency.

Madeleine Scammell, co-editor of the compilation, says the EPA has no regulatory authority in the local school, so watchdog responsibilities too often fall to teachers and parents.

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5:34am

Fri March 7, 2014
Health

How much water does the body really need?

[cipher] Flickr

Taking a water bottle to the gym or drinking a certain amount of water each day may seem like good choices.  But do they provide health benefits? This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Stanley Goldfarb, professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Goldfarb explains what his research has shown about why water is so important to the body but how you may not need as much of it as you think.

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1:14pm

Thu March 6, 2014
Health

This week: getting through menopause, eating for good health and more

Heather Shannon, director of the midwifery program at Upstate University Hospital.
Credit Upstate University Hospital

For a woman in her late 40s to early 60s, just hearing a healthcare provider assure that "you're not alone, and you're not going crazy," can be a source of comfort.

Heather Shannon, director of the midwifery program at Upstate Medical University, says that the end of childbearing years for many women comes with a multitude of symptoms: hot flashes and night sweats, depression or anxiety and mood swings. Also during this time, women may develop problems with their thyroid and/or adrenal glands. It can leave women frustrated.

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7:49am

Wed March 5, 2014
Health

EPA finalizes standards to reduce car emissions

Some rights reserved by Antonio Garcia.

The Environmental Protection Agency finalized its federal emission standards for cars and gasoline Monday, putting them in line with programs already in place in California.

The cleaner fuel and car standards will be rolled out starting in 2017. Once fully in place, the EPA estimates they’ll lower overall pollution levels and help avoid up to 2,000 early deaths per year.

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9:20am

Fri February 21, 2014
Health

Obsessive compulsive disorder manifests in variety of symptoms

zen Sutherland Flickr

Obsessive compulsive disorder is the most common anxiety disorder. At least five million Americans suffer from this disorder, which gives people obsessive thoughts. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, speak with Dr. Robin Zasio, a clinical psychologist who specializes in treating anxiety disorders. Zasio discusses obsessive compulsive disorder, and how its symptoms can affect daily life.

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2:39pm

Thu February 20, 2014
Health

Cathedral Square residents want neighborhood to be smoke free

Sudipto Sarkar Flickr

The Syracuse Common Council’s new health committee used its first meeting to discuss a smoking ban in the city’s Cathedral Square neighborhood.

The Cathedral Square Neighborhood Association has been looking to push out smoking for about three years. Now it sees a possible way to do that with the council’s newly formed health committee. The neighborhood includes the blocks surrounding Columbus Circle in downtown Syracuse.

There are a lot of questions left to be answered, like legality of such a ban and enforcement of it, said councilor Khalid Bey.

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7:00pm

Sun February 16, 2014
Health

Allergy drops could mean looking forward to spring again

Nomadic Lass Flickr

If you've ever used the phrase "a shot in the arm" to describe something as invigorating, you're probably not an allergy sufferer who's had to endure ongoing injections to control symptoms. Shots are not only painful but often inconvenient to schedule into a busy life. Yet that's been the standard course of treatment for many allergy patients for the past hundred years. Recent developments, however, may make shots obsolete for those who suffer from hay fever.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Linda Cox, talks about the new development of allergy drops. Cox is the president of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, and an allergist and immunologist from Ft. Lauderdale, Florida.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Cox.

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2:40pm

Fri February 14, 2014
Religion

Religious leaders spend week eating on $4 a day

A week's worth of food for $29.40
Ellen Abbott WRVO

The food budget for individuals receiving federal food stamps, now known as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), comes down to $29.40 a week, $4.20 a day. Members of the Religious Roundtable of Interfaith Works of Central New York are in the midst of a one-week SNAP challenge, only eating what that amount of money will buy.  

Temple Concord Rabbi Daniel Fellman says this kind of budget limits people to a carbohydrate-heavy, highly processed diet.

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5:34am

Fri February 14, 2014
Health

New medicine may ease allergy suffering

For those who suffer from allergies, allergy shots are currently the best way to get symptoms under control. But a new development could change that. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, speak with Dr. Linda Cox, the president of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. Cox discusses allergy drops, which could potentially eliminate allergies for the user.

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7:30am

Mon February 10, 2014
Politics and Government

Supporters push for GMO labeling bill

Sponsors of a bill to require the labeling of genetically modified foods, or GMO's, say they hope they have better luck this year advancing the legislation after it died in committee late last session.

The bill would require that all genetically engineered food sold in New York be clearly labeled. Assembly Sponsor Linda Rosenthal, a Democrat, says the measure would give consumers the choice of whether they want to buy genetically altered food, or not.

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7:00pm

Sun February 2, 2014
Health

Tips for living your best life after age 50

Dark Dwarf Flickr

Maybe you've taken your good health for granted. But once you turn 50, all bets are off. What you do during this decade will set the stage for a life of continued wellness or one of gradual but irreversible decline. But it's never too late to do the right thing for your body.

This week on Take Care, Huffington Post and AARP columnist Barbara Hannah Grufferman shares three essential tips for staying healthy after age 50. Grufferman has interviewed experts from around the field, and from her findings, she wrote a book called “The Best of Everything After 50.” She also serves as host of "The Best of Everything" on AARP's YouTube Channel.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Barbara Hannah Grufferman.

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5:34am

Fri January 31, 2014
Health

Food packaging does more than protect food

Every day, American consumers rely on the cans, bottles, boxes and plastic that food is sold in to keep them safe. In fact, scientists research how food packaging can help preserve food and extend shelf life. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” recently spoke with Dr. Joseph Hotchkiss, director of the school of packaging at Michigan State University about the science of food packaging.

Linda Lowen: Every package protects its contents, but what is it providing protection against?

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7:20am

Thu January 30, 2014
Environment

Cuomo's environmental commissioner says fracking delay will continue

DEC Commissioner Joe Martens testifies at a legislative budget hearing.
Karen Dewitt WXXI

One day after President Barack Obama touted hydrofracking of natural gas as a bridge fuel, Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s environmental commissioner says it’s extremely unlikely that permits for drilling wells will be issued in the next year.

Cuomo’s Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner Joe Martens testified at a legislative budget hearing. The state has had a de facto moratorium on hydrofracking for nearly six years.

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8:00am

Wed January 29, 2014
Health

Researchers pinpoint where in the brain Alzheimer's begins

Columbia University Medical Center researchers have used high resolution imaging to show that Alzheimer’s begins in a specific part of the brain, known as a gateway to the hippocampus.

Dr. Scott Small, co-author of the study, says this particular area plays a vital role in consolidating long term memories. The discovery could help with early diagnosis of the disease, and that, he says, could lead to more effective intervention.

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