plants

Back to the Fields

Jun 4, 2017

Nearly 40 years ago John Weeks changed his ways as a floral bigot and decided to view weeds equal in beauty and purpose to noninvasive plants. This episode, originally aired June 4, 1993, addresses the importance of weeds to natures' ecosystems.

How Plants Heal

Aug 17, 2016

In this episode, Jim talks about how plants heal and repair among the stresses of their environment, and shares what you can do to assist.

Why Didn't My Landscape Plants Flower?

Aug 17, 2016

Despite our best efforts, sometimes trees and shrubs fail to flower. In this episode, Jim talks about some of the possibilities as to why, and what you can do (and plant) to make the most of your landscape.

    

Saffron Blaze / Flickr

In this archived broadcast from April 15, 1988, John Weeks discusses the virtues of roadside nature watching.  Weeks talks about the sights of spring that can easily be found from your vehicle. 

Not All Mints are Minty

May 4, 2015

In this archived broadcast from August 16, 1990, John Weeks talks about mint plants. He talks about how we use mint in our everyday lives for flavoring. He talks about breaking a mint plant open and smelling the spearmint aroma. He says that hummingbirds are highly attractive to the mint plant and the smell. He also talks about the different type of mint plants and what makes them unique.

Lorianne DiSabato / via Flickr

As this seemingly never-ending winter of record cold temperatures and stubborn snowstorms drags on in central New York, it seems hard to believe that a new season is around the corner. But, spring is lurking beneath the snow pack.

stevendepolo / flickr

With vegetables readily available at any grocery store, one may forget that growing them at home is even an option. While growing plants from seed takes more time and effort than just buying them, one expert believes that not only is it worth it, but it’s actually easier to do than people may think.

This week on Take Care, Amy Jeanroy talks about the basics of growing plants from seed. Jeanroy, an expert herb gardener and contributor to About.com, has written many books on the subject, including Canning and Preserving for Dummies, 2nd edition.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Amy Jeanroy.

Reading the Message

Dec 4, 2013

This archived broadcast was from September 11, 1987. John Weeks talks about the journey across the seasons. He talks about the weather and the different animals and plants that are around during the different seasons.

You can't go wrong with fall veggies

Oct 13, 2013
Leah Landry / WRVO

What do you think of when you hear the words "fall foods?" For children, “fall foods” may mean candy corn and Halloween treats, while others may think vegetables -- things like squash, cabbage and beets. These fall under the category of autumnal vegetables, and can provide many healthy benefits to consumers of them.

This week on Take Care, nutritionist Joan Rogus talks about what makes fall vegetables good for you. Rogus is a registered dietitian in central New York who's been a member of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics for over 25 years.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Joan Rogus.

John Weeks reveals how he spent his not so typical Fathers Day! He also explains the importance of paying attention to nature.

John Weeks explains the value of plants to Wildlife and how to attract wildlife to your environment.

The Energy of Spring

Mar 8, 2013

John Weeks sees spring as an episode rather than an event. He describes how the energy required for springtime life comes from the generosity of previous seasons.

Much of nature is covered by snow each winter. John Weeks dispels the rumor that the winter landscape without snow is baron and uninteresting.

John Weeks discusses behaviors and preparations of animals and plants in nature during the winter months. He suggests that the wild world has no time for "cabin fever."

Weeks remembers his first encounter with the fall crocus. He talks about how light wavelength effects plant growth and touches on photoperiodism as it relates to the blooming of various plants.

Dig, Drop and Done

Oct 17, 2012

Jim has a rule when he bites into a really hot pepper sprout in one of Megan's five-alarm hot shot panini sandwiches while lunching out on the job;  'stop, drop, and roll.'  After recovery he then stumbles back to the flower bed to resume planting those spring bulbs.  The rule there is 'dig, drop, and done.'  It's really simple, and guaranteed to bring many springtimes of pleasure.

You Are how you Plant

Sep 1, 2012

Question: which of the following is the most sensible statement?
A) best time to do your landscape chores is on a hot, sunny day at noon.
B) best time to water your plants is on a hot, sunny day at noon.
C) best way to keep your landscape verdant and thriving is to ignore it.
D) best way to keep plants thriving is to place them where the sun and other natural conditions will work to their advantage as they become established.
(correct answer is D, unless you are a mad dog or an Englishman and inclined to take song lyrics by Noël Coward  literally)

Fall Planting

Sep 1, 2012

It's fall, the time of year we start thinking about closing up the garden shed and moving inside.  Before you put away that shovel, plant a tree.  Fall is the ideal planting season for trees, shrubs and other hardy plants.  Their roots will respond well to the head-start on spring.

Trees are Tribal

Sep 1, 2012

When a breeze blows through the trees is the wind talking - or are the trees chit-chatting? Trees are tribal.  They protect one another from dings and nicks of lawnmowers, and, working together, manage the soil around their roots much more effectively than do man-made lawn chemicals.

John Weeks discusses  the many unique and beautiful local plants that are not native to U.S. soil. Weeks explains the multitude of ways these plants arrived in the Americas. Some came to be used for food (Dandelion), while some came because of their pretty appearance (the Daisy). Others weren't actually meant to be brought here at all.

Originally aired on Jun 22, 1984.

Water Those Plants

May 25, 2012

As the summer roles on, landscape and garden soil becomes drier from constant sun at its most intense.  Many plants go dormant, but that does not mean they are dead.  They are very much alive and will appreciate your occasional offer of liquid refreshment.  Water your plants during the cool part of the day to keep them happy.

Light and Shade

May 25, 2012

Which is better, morning sun or afternoon sun?  And where does mid-day sun fit into the growing cycle?  Well... it all depends.  To learn how and why, grab your polarized sunglasses and tune in as Jim sheds light on the many shades of sunlight.

John Weeks talks about the new blooming flowers and plants of spring and how to fully enjoy the start of the new season.

Originally aired on April 21st, 1989.

John Weeks talks to listeners about baby wildlife that are left alone during the spring and how we should not worry about them. Weeks explains that departure of the young should not be taken as a sign of abandonment and what to do if you see a wildlife baby animal.

Originally aired on April 26th, 1985.

John Weeks discusses plants and trees and the first spurt of spring growth and how the April sunlight affects the blooming buds of the season.

 

Orignally aired on April 22nd, 1988.

A Visit To Baltimore Woods

Apr 17, 2012

John Weeks takes a trip to Baltimore Woods, seeking signs of the upcoming spring season, exploring all kinds of things involved in nature including plants, animals and trees.

 

Originally aired on April 19th, 1985.

Build your landscape management skills

Mar 30, 2012

Maintaining an attractive and rewarding landscape is not rocket science - but it does require constant effort toward improving management skills.  Here are some tips on how to keep those landscape challenges from getting you down.

The Iroquois had it right when they planted the 'three sisters' - corn, beans and squash.  They added something fishy to the soil, which made all the difference.  Listen to this 'fish tale' and learn how 'shadbush' got its name.

Spruce up your dormant landscaping

Mar 30, 2012

Spruce up your dormant landscaping with attractive - and deer proof - plants and accent objects that show well against gray skies and winter snow.  Use these techniques to cheer up your yard in winter and early spring.

The Energy of Spring

Mar 6, 2012

John Weeks discusses the beauty of spring and the roots and seeds that influence the many spouting plants of the warm season.

 

Originally aired March 9th, 1989.