prostate cancer

This week: Prostate cancer, plus common thyroid disorders

Oct 5, 2017

Prostate cancer is a disease of many types that has to be treated individually. Treatment options include various types of surgery, radiotherapy and medications, in addition to active surveillance and watchful waiting.

Dr. Gennady Bratslavsky provides an update on prostate cancer in this special 30-minute overview for “HealthLink on Air.”

One in seven men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in his lifetime. Urologists with expertise in oncology can help these men decide which treatment is best for them.

Screening for prostate cancer

Jun 24, 2017
Neeta Lind / Flickr

As men age, the likelihood of being diagnosed with prostate cancer goes up. And since prostate cancer is the most common cancer for American men, how to screen for this disease has been quite controversial.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo discusses the latest recommendations for prostate cancer screening. Bibbins-Domingo chairs the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force that issued new recommendations in April 2017. Bibbins-Domingo is professor of medicine and of epidemiology and biostatistics at the University of California, San Francisco.

Prostate cancer: what we know about screening

Jun 23, 2017

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men. But the recommendations about who should be screened for the disease have changed over the years, leading to some confusion. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, the chair of the U.S. preventive services task force, which released the most recent prostate cancer screening guidelines earlier this year.

“Rather than waiting until the kidney fails, you may want to be proactive and go for a pancreas transplant, specifically if you have brittle, or labile, diabetes,” says Dr. Rainer Gruessner, Upstate University Hospital’s transplant chief and professor of surgery. He and his team offer these transplant surgeries -- separately or combined with kidney transplants, for patients with diabetes mellitus (the most common cause of kidney failure).

A passion for detail and for history led Dr. Stanley Burns to amass an unparalleled collection of medical photos dating back to 1839 and to advise for historical accuracy on major TV series, such as the Cinemax’s “The Knick,” set in 1900, and PBS’s “Mercy Street,” set in the Civil War.

This week: prostate cancer biopsies and concierge medicine

Feb 26, 2016

Typical prostate biopsies use ultrasound to guide surgeons to areas where cancer tends to form. If cancer is growing in another part of the prostate, it can be missed.

The UroNav fusion biopsy system helps surgeons pinpoint areas that may harbor cancer, which are unique to individual patients. It works like a GPS navigation system, directing the biopsy needle to anything suspicious.

Upstate University Hospital urologist Srinivas Vourganti explains what men can expect from the UroNav and also gives us an overview of prostate cancer.

This week: prostate cancer, rehabilitation and fracking

Jan 8, 2016

Men with prostate cancer are often advised to hold off on radical treatment to see whether they can maintain a normal life while a doctor monitors the disease.

Medical problems that afflict inmates are not much different than the ailments that are common in the central New York community, according to Dr. Anne Calkins.

Dr. Calkins leads the medical team providing care for adults incarcerated at the Justice Center jail in downtown Syracuse and the Jamesville Correctional Facility, and for youths at the Hillbrook Juvenile Detention Center in Syracuse.

Ellen Abbott/WRVO

Upstate Medical University has a new tool that can help diagnose one of the most common cancers that strikes men. The hospital is one of the first in the nation to purchase a technology that gives doctors a more targeted approach in finding prostate cancer.

Jeff Barkley, a firefighter from Phoenix, had close family members die from prostate cancer. But even as his PSA level rose over the last several years -- that’s the blood test that is an indicator of prostate cancer -- five biopsies came back negative.

Prostate cancer: to treat or not to treat?

Apr 28, 2013
Hematology/Oncology Associates of Central New York / hoacny.com

This week on Take Care, Dr. Anthony Scalzo talks about the diagnosis of the most common cancer for men -- prostate cancer -- and its treatments. Dr. Scalzo is a medical oncologist at Hematology/Oncology Associates of Central New York, and medical advisor for the support group Man to Man, which helps men cope with prostate cancer and is sponsored by the American Cancer Society.

Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Anthony Scalzo, and for more information.

Prostate cancer: when to screen?

Apr 26, 2013

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer for men. But many of those malignancies develop so slowly, the patient is never effected by it. That fact has started a debate over who to screen for the disease, and when. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's weekly health show "Take Care" spoke with Dr. Anthony Scalzo, a medical oncologist at Hematology/Oncology Associates of Central New York, about how men should deal with this issue.

Upcoming topics: Berries and hazards in your home

Apr 23, 2013
Chuck Grimmett / Flickr

In the coming weeks on Take Care, we'll feature an interview on prostate cancer. Every man who's diagnosed faces unique challenges, often around the question of treatment. An oncologist will join us to explain why watchful waiting may be the preferred option for many. Plus, the latest super fruit.