public radio presents

Jennifer Simonson and Emily Haavik

Advocates for kids are pushing for a new approach to combating underage prostitution: treating young people caught up in sex trafficking as victims, not delinquents. This documentary looks at how police and lawmakers are increasingly turning to a public health approach to help vulnerable young people break free of sex trafficking.

This hour, we explore efforts to stop traffickers and buyers by embedding in a police sting, visiting a horse ranch for young victims of trafficking in Minnesota, and speaking with sex-buyers trying to change their ways.

As technology rapidly progresses, some proponents of artificial intelligence believe that it will help solve complex social challenges and offer immortality via virtual humans. But AI’s critics say that we should proceed with caution. That its rewards may be overpromised, and that the pursuit of superintelligence and autonomous machines may result in unintended consequences. Is this the stuff of science fiction?

Should we fear AI, or will these fears prevent the next technological revolution?

Join us on Public Radio Presents for "A Life Sentence: Victims, offenders, justice and my mother," this Sunday night.

Jay Allison, a co-producer of this piece, says: "This is a story about a terrible crime and everything that followed. It's an intensely personal documentary, but it extends into public life and into the heart of our political and correctional systems. Some stories take a long time. This one is an hour long, took two and a half years to produce, after 20 years of living with it."

Notes On Spring: A Seasonal Music Special

Mar 23, 2015

This week, an assuring hour of music and information about the promising resurgence of spring, including rare facts about the featured music and the reasons for springtime warming and rain.

A wide variety of unique vocal and instrumental performances by Mannheim Steamroller, Joni Mitchell, the London Symphony & Cambridge Singers, Jim Stafford, Timothy Seaman, Barbra Streisand, Richard Burmer, Julie Andrews, The Slovak Philharmonic,  Andrea McCardle, Steven Isserlis with Michael Tilson Thomas and Dudley Moore, William Tabbert, Stan Kenton, and John Denver.

IQ2US: Should the world bet on America?

Mar 16, 2015

This week on Intelligence Squared U.S., debate on the question "Should the world bet on America?"

Her Stories: For Women's History Month

Mar 2, 2015

Hearing Voices from NPR presents "Her Stories: For Women's History Month" this week on WRVO.

You'll hear: the Kitchen Sisters go to "Tupperware" parties; a supermarket checker checks out her life, in ZBS's radio soap Saratoga Springs; Jenifir returns "Home From Africa" with all 13 symptoms of chronic peace corps withdrawal; a collage of and about "Sisters," the story of "Ruby" and her husbands; and more.

Listen this Sunday, March 8 at 7 p.m. on WRVO.

IQ2US: Is Amazon a friend to readers?

Feb 23, 2015

This week on Intelligence Squared U.S., debate on the question "Is Amazon a friend to readers?" In late 2014, Amazon and the publishing house Hachette settled a months-long dispute over who should set the price for e-books.

Thanksgiving is right around the corner. Join us this Sunday at 7:00p.m. for a special look at the holiday and some tips for your feast.

This one-hour radio special, hosted by Dan Pashman of The Sporkful podcast, Cooking Channel’s You’re Eating It Wrong and the new book, Eat More Better: How to Make Every Bite More Delicious, is an entertaining combination of in-studio interviews, listener calls, and in-kitchen segments with food and drink experts, as well as some of public radio’s favorite personalities. You’ll learn useful tips about how to make classic Thanksgiving dishes, interesting facts about the science of cooking and the art of eating, and surprising details about the ways in which diverse cultures have adapted Thanksgiving traditions and made them their own.

Boston Public Libary / via Flickr

In 2006, the original 4.5 million doughboys of World War One had shrunk to a mere handful of veterans, aged 105 to 113. The World War I Living History Project was the only media project to recognize the legacy and contributions of this passing generation of soldiers. Producers traveled the country, interviewing the last 10 soldiers of the "war to end all wars."

It’s time for the 2014 midterm elections. Political Junkie Ken Rudin takes a look at some of the more competitive races around the nation. 

We start off with Republican Vin Weber and Democrat Anna Greenberg laying out what’s at stake on November 4th, and what it might mean for the final two years of the Obama presidency.

Yi Chen

This week, we bring you Breaking Ground: Military Children. During more than a decade of war, tens of thousands of military children have watched and waited as a parent was deployed to conflict zones overseas. 

Now, with the Department of Defense confronting budget cuts, these children face an uncertain future. What will they do if the military chooses to shut down their schools? Will they have the support they need as their parents reintegrate into civilian life? What can we learn from these children, and what duty do we as a society owe them? 

State of the Re:Union returns in August

Jul 31, 2014

This August, Public Radio Presents brings you the spring series of State of the Re:Union with host Al Letson. Every episode is like a love letter to the country -- telling the story of America, one community at a time.

Sunday, August 3 at 7 p.m. -- Hawaii: The Legacy of Sugar