recycling

'Cans for Pets' boosts recycling, helps shelters in several states

Nov 22, 2014
Kara Holsopple / Allegheny Front

Recycling saves energy -- recycling one aluminum can save enough energy to run a television for three hours. But some segments of the population apparently haven't heard that message -- like pet owners. Aluminum pet food cans are one of the least recycled household items. Now there's a program to reverse that trend with an incentive to recycle, that also helps shelter animals.

Margaret Corrado is an exception to the rule. At a pet store south of Pittsburgh, she dumps about 40 little empty cat food cans from a plastic grocery bag into a blue recycling bin.

Ellen Abbott/WRVO

Opponents to a trash to ash plan between Onondaga and Cortland Counties had their say at an informational meeting on the environmental impact of the proposed move in the town of DeWitt last night.  

The plan would truck garbage from Cortland County to Onondaga County’s trash burner in Jamesville, then return the ash to the Cortland County landfill. Many of the people who testified at the meeting had been involved in the fierce debate over whether the plant should have been built in the first place  20 years ago, and remembered the promises made to placate a community.  

Office of Onondaga County Comptroller

Onondaga County is hosting the first of several public hearings on a plan to import trash from Cortland County to burn at Onondaga County’s incinerator in Jamesville.

Onondaga County Legislator David Knapp says this is all part of the process of getting information about the potential impacts of the deal.

“Right now we’re in the scoping phase of the environmental impact process," Knapp said. "So this meeting is open to any resident to come in and give us their thoughts about what should be in the scope of the environmental review.”

Office of Onondaga County Comptroller

The so-called Trash to Ash plan is now officially before the public. The initial public comment period has started, regarding a regional solid waste partnership between Onondaga and Cortland County, but there is already opposition to the plan.
             

Ellen Abbott / WRVO

Onondaga County’s program that turns food waste into the compost and mulch we use in our gardens is expanding.

OCRRA, the Onondaga County Resource Recovery Agency, has installed new structures that make the process at the Amboy Compost Facility work like a well-oiled machine.

It all starts with the food we throw away at restaurants, schools and grocery stores; the fruit rinds, the crusts of bread and corn husks. Those scraps are dumped into a new covered mixing area at the facility on Airport Road in Amboy.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO

There’s more urgency now than ever for New York state residents to dispose of certain electronic equipment. That’s why e-waste was emphasized in one central New York community on Earth Day this year.
 

Starting in 2015, you won’t be able to dump old TVs or computer monitors in any New York state landfill. Madison County has a head start, with a ban in place for several years now, and has been shipping these TVs to a Rochester-area recycler. But Madison County Landfill Director James Zecca says they’ll still feel an impact.

Office of Onondaga County Comptroller

There will be some important decisions in the coming months about trash in Onondaga County.  An audit of the independent agency that takes care of trash removal and recycling shows that there could be changes in store for how you pay for trash and recycling pick up.

More About Recycling

Feb 13, 2014

This archived broadcast, More About Recycling, is from September 28, 1990. John Weeks talks about recycling in Onondaga County. He noticed that people who were paying weekly for the removal of their garbage were only filling it halfway or not at all. He did notice some overfilling bins on his way home one day though and it made him wonder some questions about recycling. He talks about a meeting that he attended about waste in his area and he found out that newspapers are recyclable and there was 1500 tons in just July.

OCRRA

Vendors and displays are packed up, and the New York State Fair in Syracuse is over for another year. But one of the iconic sights of the fair will live on, giving a glimpse of what could be the next big recycling trend in New York state.

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Two years after its enactment, a New York state law governing the recycling of electronic waste is making an impact according to a progress report.

Ellen Abbott/WRVO

Madison County hopes to become a hub for the recycling of agricultural plastics.  It's a waste that's created on farms that's been a problem for years.

lizard10979 / via Flickr

If you're putting away Christmas decorations and taking ornaments off the tree, Onondaga County's recycling agency wants to make sure that old tree gets re-purposed.

doviende / via Flickr

Central New Yorkers make the most trash over the holiday season, which only makes recycling all the more important this time of year, says one of the region's recycling agencies.

A General Motors facility in western New York has announced they are going green. The site in Lockport makes heating and air conditioning components for GM radiators and is the 103rd facility for the company to become landfill-free.

Recycling

Sep 21, 2012

John Weeks discusses the early days of Onondaga County's recycling program. He also talks about the shortfalls of the recycling program from an environmental standpoint and urges listeners to tighten the balance between that which is discarded in total and that which is recycled.

TarynMarie / Flickr

Some central New Yorkers appear to be confused about where to bring their e-waste. E-waste includes items like old computers, televisions and other small electronic devices.

OCRRA wants to remind central New Yorkers that they shouldn't bring those castoffs to the Onondaga County Resource Recovery Agency.

Ellen Abbot

There's a new place to shop in Madison County, and this new store will get its stock from an unlikely source, the county dump.

Plastic is Forever

May 25, 2012

Remember that old adage that diamonds are forever?  Well so are styrofoam cups, plastic liners, disposable diapers, even cigarette butts.  Paper and wood products break down in a matter of weeks, returning to the soil from which they came.  Plastics are a different matter.  Here's a sobering commentary on the importance of staying natural.