roads

Payne Horning / WRVO News

The Utica Common Council is moving forward with a plan to re-pave every road in the city after they voted last week to override the mayor's veto. The 15-year project will cost $75 million.

Mayor Robert Palmieri opposed the plan because it could require Utica to borrow more than $48 million. He said locking the city into long-term debt is ill advised. Councilman David Testa is also skeptical about the cost, noting that the plan already calls for an annual .74 percent property tax increase. 

Payne Horning / WRVO News

Utica Mayor Robert Palmieri has vetoed a plan from the Utica Common Council to re-pave every city road over the next 15 years. Palmieri said the $75 million project would place a "substantive burden" on the city's residents. 

Utica's charter currently requires the city to invest $2 million a year in paving. Under the common council's plan, residents would be asked in a referendum this fall to increase that amount to $5 million.  

Payne Horning / WRVO News

Complaints from Utica residents about the city's roads have reached a fever pitch. 

"It has been a long time since required paving has been increased and there is a big public outcry to fix the roads, it was blatantly apparent in the last campaign season," said Common Council President Michael Galime.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

As warm weather returns to the region, the last things on people’s minds are snowplows. The plows in the city of Syracuse received an upgrade this past winter that allows for more accountability.

GPS navigation tracking is now equipped on Syracuse’s plows and the commissioner of the Department of Public Works, Pete O’Connor, said they can now relay the information it gathers to residents.  

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

The city of Syracuse is putting a technology called SQUID into use this month, which is meant to help city hall make smarter choices when it comes to fixing crumbling streets.

SQUID – or Street Quality Identification Device – is a tiny contraption that sits on the bed of a pickup truck used by the Syracuse Department of Public Works, designed to measure the quality of the streets of Syracuse.

Varun Adibhatla is project director of ARGO labs, which came up with the technology. He says Syracuse is the first city to use it.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

The American Society of Civil Engineers issued gave New York’s infrastructure and gave an overall grade of C- on its 2015 report card. Syracuse officials hope infrastructure funding will come soon from the state and federal governments.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

The aging infrastructure across upstate New York has created another problem in the city of Syracuse: sinkholes in the streets. The city is expected to pay for the majority of these repairs.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

The city of Syracuse hopes to use a $10 million infusion from a New York State Assembly fund for infrastructure as a springboard to even more cash to help repair the crumbling waterlines and sewer pipes that dog the city.  

oliver_hine / via Flickr

Will the Syracuse region’s infrastructure include more bike lanes or bridges in thirty years? The city’s transportation planning agency is trying to map out some of those questions in a new vision document.

America’s recent shift toward urban living would lend itself to a desire for more bike lanes and public transportation, but that won’t eliminate the need for interstates and quality roadways.

John Weeks looks back on an old Nature of Things program where he reviewed an old past time he calls cruising for wildlife. He's been cruising for wildlife for the past 50 years and talks about the number of kills he found while on the road. He was so interested that he was able to find out the reason for the casualty by observing the animal. Though it may sound gruesome it was yet very educational and he takes us down the evolution of that journey.

This episode was originally aired October 25th, 1991.

John Weeks discusses the significance of road names. He talks about which road names really reflect the natural history of the area and which reflect the names of residences or simply reflect uncoordinated labels applied to housing develops. Different areas of Central New York have different names and we are going to find out how these roads got their names and the stories behind them.

This episode of Nature of Things was originally aired on September 23rd, 1988.

Marie Cusick / WMHT

Transporting the millions of gallons of water, as well as equipment, sand, and other materials needed to hydraulically fracture a natural gas well requires quite a few truck trips, to put it mildly.

One well site could require up to 3,399 one-way truck trips [PDF], according to the New York Department of Environmental Conservation's 2011 draft environmental impact statement (dSGEIS) on hydrofracking.

All those trips by heavy trucks can quickly beat up and wear out roads if they're not built to handle it.