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Syracuse Press Club

If you’ve heard me during one of our on-air fundraisers, you’ve probably heard a version of my story before. I wasn’t really that familiar with public radio and NPR until I took a job at the local public radio station during grad school.

I fell in love. As a journalism major and news junky, NPR was my new favorite thing.

WRVO Public Media seeks a Director of News and Public Affairs to lead our award-winning News Department. While this position is located on the campus of SUNY Oswego, this is not a New York State position.

Jim Mattis / Flickr

The Senate Judiciary Committee is holding a hearing this morning about foreign agents and attempts to influence the U.S. election. The panel is among the bodies investigating Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. Senators had requested Donald Trump Jr. and Paul Manafort, President Trump's former campaign chairman, to appear as witnesses. Instead, they are in closed-door discussions for now.

Masters of Scale

Jul 25, 2017

Hosted by LinkedIn co-founder and investor Reid Hoffman, "Masters of Scale" is an original series in which Hoffman tests his theories about how companies grow from zero to a gazillion. In conversation with famous founders, Hoffman connects the dots between fascinating disparate stories with the aim of illuminating big concepts and simple hacks that can change everything.

Hear these episodes through the end of August on WRVO.

IQ2US

Imagine getting a check from the government every month. $600 guaranteed. It’s happening in Finland, where a pilot program is being launched to test what’s known as a “universal basic income.” This week, we debate that reality.

NASA's James Webb Space Telescope / Flickr

This week on "Re:sound," stories of those who share and those who creep in the shadows. You'll hear:

The Mollusc and the Peacock by Natalie Kestecher (Short Cuts, BBC Radio 4, 2014)

This is the story of a Facebook lurker, someone who sees herself as curious but benign. Like her grandmother, who was a fan of American soap operas, she has a taste for stories about the lives of others just as long as they’re glamorous and extravagant and don’t bear too much resemblance to reality.

Voyager Found by Jonathan Mitchell (The Truth, 2014)

Fredrik Rubensson / Flickr

This week on "Re:sound," from the Third Coast Audio Festival, two stories of love through loss. We'll also enjoy an interview with the producers who've written their way through these troubled moments. Tune in for:

The Updates by Sophie Townsend with Sound Engineer Louis Mitchell. (360documentaries, ABC RN 2014)

Last week, WRVO said goodbye to General Manager Michael S. Ameigh as he is now -- officially -- retired. We say officially because there had always been talk of retirement, as their often is after many years of dedicated service. We just never though it would actually happen!

Jon Fife / Flickr

This week on "Re:sound," heard Sunday nights on WRVO, uninvited guests like old lovers, irrational fears and the annoying habits that keep us up at night. You'll hear:

Like Steps Of Passing Ghosts by Kaitlin Prest (a Falling Tree Production for The Essay, BBC Radio 3, 2015)

Kaitlin Prest explores how we can remain haunted by past loves 'Like Steps of Passing Ghosts.'

Holdout by Katie Mingle and Roman Mars (99% Invisible, 2014)

A woman watches while a shopping mall goes up all around her.

Andrew Houser / Flickr

This week, on "Re:sound," we'll turn down the thermostat and usher in stories that gives us the chills. This Sunday you'll hear:

I Fell Through the Ice by Dennis Funk and Gwen Macsai (Re:sound debut, 2016)

Phil Smith grew up skating on frozen lakes. But one New Year's Eve, reliving his childhood memories put him in a life and death situation.

Overland by Nate DiMeo (The Memory Palace , 2016)

What realities should we entertain for ourselves?

How does culture help shape the reality each of us lives in?

Join us this Sunday for a special hour of Re:sound, in which the team shares their favorite entires to the 2016 ShortDocs Challenge.

This show features the entries, as well as interviews with producers, a visit to Manual Cinema -- who are adapting the winning ShortDoc into a live shadow puppetry performance -- and more.

Tune in this Sunday, June 18 at 7 p.m. for this episode of Re:sound. If you missed it on-air, you can hear it online.

Ryan J. Reilly / Flickr

Today, Attorney General Jeff Sessions is scheduled to testify before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence. He's expected to field questions about Russian efforts to influence the 2016 election, the ongoing investigation of Russian contacts with Trump campaign and administrative officials, and the dismissal of former FBI Director James Comey.

NPR News and WRVO will be providing live coverage of the hearing starting at 2:30 p.m. on-air. Tune in across central and northern New York or online.

Former FBI Director James Comey's remarks, annotated

Jun 8, 2017
Brookings Institution / Flickr

Former FBI Director James Comey testified before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence this morning at approximately 10 a.m. It was the first time Comey spoke publicly since being fired by President Donald Trump nearly a month ago.

The Senate committee is looking into the circumstances around Comey's dismissal and how they relate to the FBI investigation of Russian interference in the U.S. election. 

Herm Card / Syracuse Press Club

WRVO Public Media has once again been recognized for excellence in journalism and public affairs content. This spring, the WRVO News team received awards from both the Syracuse Press Club (SPC) and New York State Associated Press Association (NYSAPA).

For Best News Feature, Ellen Abbott's piece "Farmers try to find ways to deal with more severe weather" received top honors.

Marina Muun for NPR

What happens when people can't agree on reality? Many in our increasingly polarized society confront this question every day.

martin_vmorris / Flickr

Join us as "Re:sound" returns to the airwaves in June and July. This week we're going on three “soundwalks” that meander at the pace of real life.

First, the 4700 block of Liberty Heights Avenue is a portrait of survival and adaptability. It's a self-governed, informal economy where the currency is respect. Space is shared by merchants, churches, longtime residents, and drug dealers. Immigrants from Afghanistan, Pakistan, Nepal, West Africa, and Korea have set up shops alongside a dwindling number of African American-owned businesses. Trust is earned here, not given lightly.

Marina Muun for NPR

In the first stories of the new season, we're giving emotions a similar treatment to the one we gave to thoughts in the very first episode of "Invisibilia" (The Secret History of Thoughts). Where do our emotions come from? How seriously should we take them? Do they tell us truths about the world that should guide our behavior or should we be more skeptical about them?

To explore these questions, we look at an unusual case in the American justice system. Then we follow a man as he discovers a new emotion that no one in western culture has experienced before.

Join us this Sunday for a one-hour special with "All Things Considered" host Kelly McEvers. In-depth reporting from the "Embedded" podcast will investigate videos of police encounters and how the proliferation of this kind of video has affected life in America.

Note: This hour contains graphic and sensitive subject matter and may not be appropriate for young children. Please read the summary that follows to determine if these are topics are something you'd be comfortable with younger listeners hearing.

"Invisibilia" is back this spring with their third season. This time, they're exploring the nature of reality and our role in creating it with four new episodes. Join the team as they explore the invisible forces that shape human behavior -- thoughts, emotions, assumptions and expectations.

The new seasons starts Sunday, June 4. We'll be airing "Invisibilia" every Sunday at 10 a.m. through June. It will replace the last hour of "Weekend Edition" on Sunday, but remember you can hear that same hour at 8 a.m.

You can have your story heard this July when StoryCorps comes to Syracuse. In partnership with Syracuse Jewish Family Service (SJFS), StoryCorps will be conducting interviews from Sunday, July 16 to Tuesday, July 18 (there will be additional opportunities to have your stories heard after this time, as well).

"We Knew JFK" is an hour-long radio documentary on the life of John F. Kennedy, told in oral history form, through the first-person recollections of those who knew him. The program is constructed from a remarkable collection of audio interviews, recorded half a century ago and archived at the Kennedy Library in Boston, where they have gone largely unheard by the general public.

Join us this Sunday for the next "Intelligence Squared U.S." debate. This time, we take a look at the charter school.

In the 25 years since Minnesota passed the first charter school law, these publicly funded but privately operated schools have become a highly sought-after alternative to traditional public education, particularly for underserved students in urban areas. Between 2004 and 2014 alone, charter school enrollment increased from less than 1 million to 2.5 million students.

Jeff Rea, Office of Communications and Marketing / SUNY Oswego

WRVO Public Media recently welcomed members of the community and alumni of SUNY Oswego to our satellite studio in downtown Syracuse. The Oswego Alumni Association hosted the event, which included an update on all of the exciting things happening at SUNY Oswego, live music with Jeff Sawyer and tours of the studios.

Exodus '47

May 9, 2017

From Inside Out Documentaries, "Exodus '47" is the story of three men who served aboard the Exodus 1947, a Jewish refugee ship that tried to run thousands of holocaust survivors past the British blockade of Palestine in 1947.

You'll hear from three men who experienced that journey: Bill Millman, Frank Lavine and Nat Nadler. Before there was an Israel, these men (and nearly 40 others) climbed aboard a rusted American ferryboat and set out from Philadelphia to transport thousands of Jewish holocaust survivors.

Join WRVO for journeys to freedom, on two legs and four:

Ten years ago, more than 50 pit bulls were discovered at a dog fighting ring in Virginia. Most people thought they couldn't be saved. But their stories had just begun.

And 150 years ago, two girls crossed the Missouri River trying to escape a life of slavery.

In the summer of 2016, a high school teacher and his students set out on a 500-mile journey to follow in their footsteps.

"The Response: America's Story" seeks listeners' unique stories about they lives they lead, and their hopes for the next four years. The series offers Americans a chance to share their realities and reflections with the world.

The fourth segment of the series asks "How has the first 100 days of the Trump presidency affected you?" We hear Americans' answers on Sunday, April 30 at 7 p.m.

Thirsty Planet

Apr 12, 2017
Stephen Smith / APM Reports

Scientists say most people on Earth will first experience climate change in terms of water -- either too much or too little. This documentary explores some of the most pressing water problems and some innovative solutions by visiting two countries where water issues are critical: India and Israel.

Over 70 years ago, in 1945, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and King Abdul Aziz of Saudi Arabia met onboard he USS Quincy. A close relationship between the two countries has been maintained ever since, with oil and military and intelligence cooperation at its foundation. But the 9/11 attacks, the U.S. shale revolution, human rights concerns, and diverging interests in the Middle East have all put strains on this relationship.

Has this special relationship outlived its usefulness or is it too important to walk away from? Hear the debate on WRVO.

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