Station Announcement

Announcements about scheduled outages, events, changes in signals or last minute program changes.

You can have your story heard this July when StoryCorps comes to Syracuse. In partnership with Syracuse Jewish Family Service (SJFS), StoryCorps will be conducting interviews from Sunday, July 16 to Tuesday, July 18 (there will be additional opportunities to have your stories heard after this time, as well).

"We Knew JFK" is an hour-long radio documentary on the life of John F. Kennedy, told in oral history form, through the first-person recollections of those who knew him. The program is constructed from a remarkable collection of audio interviews, recorded half a century ago and archived at the Kennedy Library in Boston, where they have gone largely unheard by the general public.

Join us this Sunday for the next "Intelligence Squared U.S." debate. This time, we take a look at the charter school.

In the 25 years since Minnesota passed the first charter school law, these publicly funded but privately operated schools have become a highly sought-after alternative to traditional public education, particularly for underserved students in urban areas. Between 2004 and 2014 alone, charter school enrollment increased from less than 1 million to 2.5 million students.

Jeff Rea, Office of Communications and Marketing / SUNY Oswego

WRVO Public Media recently welcomed members of the community and alumni of SUNY Oswego to our satellite studio in downtown Syracuse. The Oswego Alumni Association hosted the event, which included an update on all of the exciting things happening at SUNY Oswego, live music with Jeff Sawyer and tours of the studios.

Exodus '47

May 9, 2017

From Inside Out Documentaries, "Exodus '47" is the story of three men who served aboard the Exodus 1947, a Jewish refugee ship that tried to run thousands of holocaust survivors past the British blockade of Palestine in 1947.

You'll hear from three men who experienced that journey: Bill Millman, Frank Lavine and Nat Nadler. Before there was an Israel, these men (and nearly 40 others) climbed aboard a rusted American ferryboat and set out from Philadelphia to transport thousands of Jewish holocaust survivors.

Join WRVO for journeys to freedom, on two legs and four:

Ten years ago, more than 50 pit bulls were discovered at a dog fighting ring in Virginia. Most people thought they couldn't be saved. But their stories had just begun.

And 150 years ago, two girls crossed the Missouri River trying to escape a life of slavery.

In the summer of 2016, a high school teacher and his students set out on a 500-mile journey to follow in their footsteps.

"The Response: America's Story" seeks listeners' unique stories about they lives they lead, and their hopes for the next four years. The series offers Americans a chance to share their realities and reflections with the world.

The fourth segment of the series asks "How has the first 100 days of the Trump presidency affected you?" We hear Americans' answers on Sunday, April 30 at 7 p.m.

Thirsty Planet

Apr 12, 2017
Stephen Smith / APM Reports

Scientists say most people on Earth will first experience climate change in terms of water -- either too much or too little. This documentary explores some of the most pressing water problems and some innovative solutions by visiting two countries where water issues are critical: India and Israel.

Over 70 years ago, in 1945, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and King Abdul Aziz of Saudi Arabia met onboard he USS Quincy. A close relationship between the two countries has been maintained ever since, with oil and military and intelligence cooperation at its foundation. But the 9/11 attacks, the U.S. shale revolution, human rights concerns, and diverging interests in the Middle East have all put strains on this relationship.

Has this special relationship outlived its usefulness or is it too important to walk away from? Hear the debate on WRVO.

You can listen to hand-picked stories, based on what you like, with NPR One. It's public radio made personal.

NPR One delivers the news of the day, interesting stories, the issues facing residents of central and northern New York, podcasts and more. The difference between listening on the radio and listening with NPR One is that your listening is curated with NPR One. You can skip stories or like stories based on your interests and mood.

Bev Sykes / Flickr

For National Poetry Month, WRVO is bringing you "Hearing Voices: Wordshakers."

An hour-long program full of poetry, this special features "The Charge of the Light Brigade," Walt Whitman's "America," found poems and more. Tune in this Sunday, April 2 at 7 p.m. for our kick-off of National Poetry Month.

Missed the program live? You can listen online, any time.

From "The Response: America's Story," we bring you a program about immigration, one of President Trump's signature issues.

The NPR Politics team will live blog the Senate Judiciary Committee's hearings on the nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the U.S. Supreme Court. The live blog will include streaming video, with posts featuring highlights, context and analysis from NPR reporters and correspondents (below).

This live blog will update when proceedings begin on Tuesday, March 21. Although it is not yet confirmed, the hearings are anticipated to begin at 9 a.m.

The NPR Two-Way blog is providing live coverage of the House Intelligence Committee's public hearing on the investigations into alleged Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. Presidential election.

The live blog (found below) includes streaming video of the proceedings, with posts featuring highlights, context and analysis from NPR reporters and correspondents. 

The blog will begin after the hearing starts at 10 a.m. on Monday, March 20.

Marion S. Trikosko / Library of Congress

Award-winning playwright Marcus Gardley's latest play is titled "X." It tells the story of the assassination of Malcolm X, both the story we think we know, and the details seldom shared. Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar" provides the framework for Gardley to deepen our understanding of this complex, compelling figure in the tumultuous era of the 1960s.  

President Donald Trump's budget proposes eliminating public media funding.

Without this critical seed funding -- roughly $1.35 per American taxpayer per year -- some stations could be forced to downsize or find other ways to make ends meet. While the success of WRVO does not rest on funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting alone, we do rely on that funding for a portion of our budget. While we are committed to finding other ways to fund our service, if this funding were to disappear, the future is uncertain. And this goes farther than your local public radio station.

Geoff Livingston / Flickr

The week of March 20 is expected to be a busy one on Capitol Hill, as high-profile hearings take place in the House and Senate.

On Monday, March 20, the House Intelligence Committee is holding a hearing on Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. election. FBI Director James Comey and Admiral Mike Rogers, director of the National Security Agency, are among those being called to testify. The hearing is scheduled from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

We reached our goal! And that means, although we had planned to fundraise until Saturday afternoon, we're done with on-air fundraising for the rest of the day. We thought it might happen early, and you made it possible with your contributions.

As of this morning, we've raised $184,000 -- that's actually $4,000 above our original goal. We had an incredible first two hours of "Morning Edition," thanks to some challenges and some listeners who were up early today, and were able to finish the fundraiser more than a day early.

"I listen to WRVO as part of my job, monitoring the quality of the audio and transmitter coverage. We also use a variety of techniques to send audio from WRVO to the 10 repeater stations in our network, and each one must be checked regularly."

A day in the life of our chief engineer, Jeff Windsor, as he listens with a sensitive ear. But don't think he doesn't relax now and then to just enjoy the programs!

"I also listen to WRVO because I find the tone of the programs, newscasters and hosts to be level-headed and not sensational."

How about we wrap this whole fundraising thing up?

WRVO's spring fundraiser is well on its way. We've been up at 5 a.m. (earlier in Jason's case), on the air at 6 a.m. and closing up shop 12 hours later. But it's all worth it!

We're within striking distance. We've told you our goal is $180,000. We've told you we're going to stop fundraising when we reach that goal. And now we're telling you that it could happen tomorrow morning. We can't guarantee it! But when you have a feeling, you have a feeling, right?

Syracuse Press Club

"I listen to NPR for its quality journalism. NPR news stories inform me, entertain me and always make me think. And I know I can trust NPR's reporting. I enjoy the variety of topics NPR reports on -- from sports to religion, and my obsession, political news."

Our news director, Catherine Loper, is a big fan of political news -- for obvious reasons. But she has some room in her heart for other NPR programs too.

"I love "Wait, Wait... Don't Tell Me!" and "Car Talk," even though car repair is one of my least-favorite things on Earth!"

In 2014, the shooting of Michael Brown by police officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, Missouri, set off a wave of protests and sparked a movement targeting racial disparities in criminal justice. Since then, there have been other controversial deaths of African Americans at the hands of law enforcement that have captured the public’s attention, from Tamir Rice, to Philando Castile.

Leah Landry / WRVO

"I listen to NPR because I trust their reporters and hosts to provide me with accurate facts in a non-biased context. We can't expect to solve our problems if we can't first come to a consensus about the facts."

Station Manager Bill Drake has been in this business for a while. He came to us from Northern Public Radio (WNIU and WNIJ) in DeKalb, Illinois.

Wiktor Kettel / Flickr CC by-nc 2.0: http://bit.ly/1MJUuvg

This isn't just any spring fundraiser at your local public radio station. We're being upfront about exactly how much money we need to receive to maintain our service to central and northern New York.

Our goal for this spring fundraiser is $180,000. Thanks to generous donations received during February, we're on our way to reaching that goal. But much like our upstate winters tend to hold on, we're not out of the woods yet! We still need to receive about $100,000 during this on-air drive.

This BBC and APM co-production, "The Response - America's Story" seeks listeners' unique stories about the lives they lead and their hopes for the next four years. Americans can tell their realities and reflections of the world, using the technology in their pockets.

In this special broadcast, Sunday, March 5 at 7 p.m., Americans tell their experience of health. Hosted by the BBC's Shaimaa Khalil, this episode presents diverse voices reflecting on human realities of health -- a major focus of the Trump administration's first 100 days. 

dispicio / Flickr CC by 2.0: http://bit.ly/2luKD1Z

Yesterday was the final day of Foneless February. That means spring is just around the corner, but it also means that for the past 28 days, WRVO asked for your contribution ahead of the on-air fundraiser without interrupting programming -- and you responded!

Tomorrow, Tuesday, February 28, President Donald Trump will deliver his address to a joint session of Congress at 9 p.m.

WRVO will be providing live, special coverage from NPR of the President's speech as well as the Democratic response, hosted by Audie Cornish. This will be the first address to Congress of Trump's presidency.  Analysis will be provided by White House correspondent Scott Horsley, national political correspondent Mara Liasson, Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman, national correspondent John Burnett and Congressional correspondent Sue Davis.

The story of two more cases the Stearns County Sheriff's Department had trouble solving, and a man whose life was ruined when he was wrongly suspected of killing a police officer. It includes data showing a shockingly low clearance rate for major crimes not just in Stearns County but in many other places around the country. Afterward, the team of reporters discuss why there is no authority that can put pressure on local law enforcement to do a better job of solving crimes.

You can take a stand for the local stations and programs you love with Protect My Public Media. Protect My Public Media is a campaign to support the federal investment in America's public media system. The goal is to motivate supporters (like you!) to take action to protect federal funding for public media.

WRVO

Thanks to you, our listeners and members, we're on our way to meeting our goal for this spring -- $180,000 in donations. So far, we've raised about $20,000 in February, ahead of our spring fundraiser in March. It's a great start! And we're so happy to hear from listeners who value our service enough to donate.

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