Take Care

Take a look in the mirror. Are you beauty sick?

2 hours ago
Sam Sanford / Flickr

In a society where celebrities’ weights make the covers of tabloids and every health magazine sells a new way to look beautiful, one author is working to turn that focus inward.

Renee Engeln is a professor in the department of psychology at Northwestern University and author of “Beauty Sick: How the Cultural Obsession with Appearance Hurts Girls and Women.” She spoke with us on “Take Care” to discuss why women are especially affected by society’s focus on physical beauty.

orionpozo / Flickr

Recent trends have shown more people over the age of 65 are returning to work after retirement or only partially retiring rather than stopping work entirely. An economist at Harvard Medical School said this practice -- known as "unretirement" -- is becoming increasingly common, and not because of economic straits.

Nicole Maestas teaches health care policy at Harvard and conducted a study in 2010 about retirement trends. On this episode, we talked about the desire to continue working later in life.

Autopilot is death and other truths of midlife

May 19, 2018
TEDxAmoskeagMillyard/Flickr

Media has long depicted a person’s 40s and 50s as the time of the dreaded midlife crisis, when they begin questioning their purpose in life and inevitably get a faster car or a younger spouse. Our guest today says this could not be farther from the truth.

Barbara Bradley Hagerty is a journalist -- she was a longtime correspondent for NPR. Her book, “Life Reimagined: The Science, Art and Opportunity of Midlife,” is part research project part memoir. She spoke with us about the myth of the midlife crisis on "Take Care" and how you can seize the opportunities presented by midlife.

Accepting yourself: Aging and body image

May 17, 2018
Llima Orosa

This time on "Take Care," we take a look in the mirror (and, hopefully, a look inside ourselves). WRVO's health and wellness show is exploring body image, aging and acceptance this time around with a number of experts in these fields.

Cameron Harris/Flickr

The adage that a pear-shaped body is healthier than an apple-shaped body is prevalent in today’s health literature, but experts and research suggest that genes are to blame for the body types, and America’s cultural obsession with changing body shape is causing women in particular a lot of emotional and physical strain.

David Marshall / WXXI News

Opioids can have devastating consequences for the people who abuse them, affecting their health, safety and freedom -- but it doesn’t stop there.

Drug abuse can ruin the lives of people who never touch the substances themselves.

Temple University

As the opioid epidemic continues across the country, one graduate student is working on the collegiate level to provide a support system to treat opioid and other types of addiction on campus.

Bob Lamb is a graduate student in the Master of Public Health program at Temple University in Philadelphia and founder of the Temple Collegiate Recovery Program, a student group dedicated to fostering a community of peers in recovery. He spoke with us on “Take Care” about his personal and academic journey with addiction and how college programs can be an important part of recovery.

Jonathan Dickinsin/Flickr

As an overdose crisis continues to afflict Philadelphia, debate is heating up over the future of possible supervised injection sites in the city as a possible solution.

"Take Care" spoke with Elana Gordon, reporter and producer for WHYY in Philadelphia and the founding member of their weekly health and science program, The Pulse, about the situation and progress there.

Cindy Shelbey/Flickr

West Virginia has been one of the hardest-hit states in the opioid epidemic, especially when it comes to neonatal abstinence syndrome -- a condition where addicted mothers give birth to drug-exposed babies.

"Take Care" spoke with Dr. Sean Loudin, pediatrician and neonatologist at Cabell Huntington Hospital in West Virginia and assistant professor at the Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall University, regarding his research and efforts surrounding treating this growing problem.

Clear Sky Treatment Center/Flickr

As the opioid crisis continues to affect millions of Americans, researchers are working to counteract addiction more effectively.

"Take Care" spoke with Dr. Richard Rawson, a professor at the Vermont Center on Behavior and Health at the University of Vermont and professor emeritus at UCLA School of Medicine, about his research and possible solutions to multiple forms of drug addiction.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO Public Media

 

The Surgeon General has issued a public health advisory urging more Americans to carry naloxone, a drug that can reverse an opioid overdose. It is not the only solution to the opioid epidemic, but experts say keeping people alive is the first step.

North Devon Council / Flickr

This time on "Take Care," how technology meets cleanliness when it comes to fighting the flu with light and electrostatic sprayers. Plus, we'll talk to the lead on a trial out of Rochester testing a universal flu vaccine.

In the wake of another fatal flu season in the U.S., national nonprofit Families Fighting Flu is spreading awareness about influenza and the vaccine that can prevent its fatal effects. Serese Marotta, chief operating officer, joined the organization in 2010 and has fully supported the group’s purpose ever since.

Government of Prince Edward Island/Flickr

As the current fatal flu season winds down, how to handle the next is on many public health officials’ minds.

Pediatrician Dr. Howard Markel is a social and cultural historian of medicine, public health and epidemics and director of the Center for the History of Medicine at the University of Michigan. He spoke with "Take Care" to discuss his research and how it can be used to prevent future flu outbreaks as bad as this season’s.

Influenza: Facts, myths and prevention

Mar 24, 2018
Daniel Paquet / Flickr

As we set out to examine influenza on "Take Care," we wanted to start out with the basics. Flu is one of those illnesses that carries with it a lot of baggage in the form of myths and tall tales. After all, hasn't anyone ever told you that you can get the flu from the vaccine? (You can't.)

Dr. Angela Campbell, medical officer in the influenza division of the CDC, joined us to share her insight into this year's flu virus and how to prevent contracting it.

Smile Train

This statement, and others, dot the website of Smile Train -- a charitable organization treating cleft lip and cleft palate in the developing world. These conditions can cause complications in speech, eating and even breathing.

eSight Eyewear

It’s not easy to keep up with the latest in health and wellness. Each day, new studies, research and developments in health make it difficult to pick out the most important information for you.

We’ll be sharing a few of the latest developments in health at the end of each episode of “Take Care” this year. As the year goes on, we may even revisit some earlier news to see where things stand months later.

Today we’re covering a couple of interesting ways that health is intersecting technology and the first is quite a breakthrough.

Is corporate America driving your charitable donations?

Feb 4, 2018
audreyjm529 / Flickr

Not all pink ribbons are created equal, according to the "Take Care" guest we're speaking to today.

Dr. Mara Einstein is a researcher, author and professor at Queens College, CUNY, who dissects the effects of marketing on society and on ourselves. Her latest book is “Black Ops Advertising: Native Ads, Content Marketing and the Covert World of the Digital Sell.”

A blood donor on his incredible commitment

Feb 3, 2018
Red Cross

For decades, the Red Cross has been encouraging people to give blood, especially during times of hardship. When Jerry Ball was in his teens, he heard that call and he’s been giving ever since. Jerry has donated blood over 200 times -- 268 times, to be exact.

“You can donate whole blood every 56 days, so I just sign up every 56 days,” Jerry says.

When Jerry was growing up, it was the 1970s. There was a war going on. The need was there. That’s why he started his commitment to donating.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Resources for families with young children can be scarce, from diapers to milk. Often, there is no government assistance to help struggling families with these necessities. But there are grassroots organizations that step up at the local level to help new families. 

Allison Brooks of the Salvation Army in Syracuse said the need for diapers hit home for her a few years ago when she was working at a food pantry.

For the past six years, the Health Foundation for Western and Central New York has supported health and wellness programming on WRVO. While the vehicle has changed over the years, from community forums to weekly shows and hour-long specials, they’ve been committed to supporting our effects to bring listeners the latest in health and wellness news that affects your community and your life.

A few changes are coming to the weekend lineup on WRVO Public Media this year.

Jeremy Costello / Flickr

Pets give you love and affection but can they be good for your health? Not only do pets bring people together but they can prolong your life and fill the need people have to take care of something, according to this week's guest.

Studies have shown that pets can be a driving force in patients doing better and living longer. Mayo Clinic Oncologist Dr. Edward Creagan joins us on "Take Care" to discuss how pets impact our lives -- potentially more than we impact theirs.

Ray García / Flickr

Music from your past has the ability to "take you back" and music therapy may be able to do the same. People who haven’t spoken in years can sing lyrics and even immobile patients are able to tap along to the rhythm of familiar music. This week, how music therapy is able to tap into the brains of those with speech and motor disorders caused by Alzheimer’s, dementia, stroke, and traumatic brain injury.

Dr. Concetta Tomaino was one of the first music therapists in the world and remains to be a pioneer in the field. She worked with Dr. Oliver Sacks; a renowned neurologist to found the Institute for Music and Neurologic Function, where she continues to serve as executive director. She joins us on "Take Care" to discuss her work in music therapy and how it's improving people's lives.

yimix / Flickr

One of the first decisions you have to make after finding out you are having a baby is the type of birth you are going to have. There are many options, from a traditional hospital birth to one in a birthing center. Some mothers even consider a home birth if complications don't seem to be on the horizon. Either way, choosing one right for your situation could be a daunting task. Joining us this week on "Take Care" is Dr. Jill Hechtman, she is the medical director of Tampa Obstetrics. We'll breaks down each birthing method, plus the advantages and disadvantages of each.

U.S. Department of Agriculture / Flickr

Over the past decade, there has been an uptick in children with peanut allergies. The usual recommendation is children that are high risk for the allergy to avoid all peanut products before the age of three. A recent study is challenging the idea of total peanut avoidance. The LEAP study has come out with new guidelines that might prevent high risk children from developing the allergy.

Dr. Gerald Nepom is the emeritus director of Benaroya Research Institute and has published over 350 scientific papers in the areas of immunology, genetics and autoimmunity. He joins us to explain LEAP, the study’s findings, and the new guidelines on peanut allergies.

Denise Krebs / Flickr

Over the past decade, there has been an uptick in children with peanut allergies. The usual recommendation is children that are high risk for the allergy to avoid all peanut products before the age of three. A recent study is challenging the idea of total peanut avoidance. The LEAP study has come out with new guidelines that might prevent high risk children from developing the allergy.

 

A safe and happy holiday is within reach

Dec 9, 2017
Isabell Hubert / flickr

The much-anticipated holiday season is full of joy, but it’s also full of dashing through the snow to the mall with a cold to get some last-minute gifts. It’s seeing relatives you wished you could spend time with more often and some you wish you could write off altogether. And while setting up your Christmas light display makes the grandkids happy, it also means getting up on your very steep roof.

Like anything, the holiday season has pros and cons. In this holiday special, we’ll try to get you off on the right foot. Whether it’s staying healthy, keeping track of your finances in this busy spending time, or focusing on the positive when you’re hosting 20 relatives for dinner -- there are ways to start off 2018 relatively unscathed. First, we’ll focus on physical health.

For most people the holidays are a happy and healthy time, but some people do end up in the emergency room. Injuries seen in emergency facilities around the holidays include falls, cuts and back pain, among others. Most occur because, around the holidays, people are doing things they don't normally -- like reaching for heavy boxes in the attic.

This week on a special hour-long edition of "Take Care," we examine some holiday-related injuries with Dr. Michael Boniface, an emergency room doctor at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida.

Rubbertoe (Robert Batina) / Flickr

Most contact sports today require players to wear a helmet. Cyclists and skiers wear them to protect from serious injury if they fall. While helmet technology has come a long way, there is still a push to make sure that they are providing as much protection as possible.

Dr. Stefan Duma is a professor of engineering and the founding director of the Virginia Tech-Wake Forest Center for Injury Biomechanics. Duma joins us to discuss his research and the STAR safety rating system given to hockey and football helmets.

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