Take Care

Eelke / Flickr

With so many health products and practices promising to provide quick fixes to all that ails us, it can be difficult to discern which ones actually work. But for doctors and medical researchers, the question of effectiveness becomes an opportunity for clinical studies.

To find out more about some of these studies, “Take Care” spoke with Dr. Joann Manson, a professor of medicine at Harvard University, and chief of the Division of Preventive Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

Why sleep deprivation & driving don't mix

Apr 21, 2017
Saurabh Mishra / Flickr

Much attention has been given to the dangers of driving while drunk. But, if you're sleep deprived and you get behind the wheel, it can be just as risky. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Jake Nelson, director of traffic safety advocacy and research for AAA, about the dangers of drowsy driving.

Cupping: not just for Olympians

Apr 8, 2017
Amy Selleck / Flickr

If you tuned in to the Olympics last summer, you may have noticed a few athletes with large, round bruises on their backs. Myofascial decompression, commonly known as “cupping,” began as a traditional Chinese practice, but has since become a standard modality for patients and athletes alike, including gold medalist Michael Phelps. So what does it entail, exactly?

To find out, “Take Care” is joined by Dr. Kevin Rindal, a chiropractor and member of the 2016 USA Olympic Swim Team medical staff. Rindal specializes in chiropractic spinal and extremity manipulation, as well as soft tissue rehabilitation. He is also the founder and CEO of InHealth, a sports injury and performance facility in Seattle, Washington.

Yogurt: as good as they say?

Apr 8, 2017
Tracy Benjamin / Flickr

Widely regarded as part of a balanced diet, yogurt has been nothing short of trendy in recent years. On any given trip to your local supermarket, you’re likely to come across dozens of varieties, so which ones are actually good for you?

To shed some light on the nutrition behind yogurt, “Take Care” spoke with Johannah Sakimura, who received her master’s in nutrition from the Columbia University Institute of Human Nutrition, and is now a registered dietician and nutritionist from the Atlantic Health System.

avery / Flickr

Remember those circular purple bruises on swimmer Michael Phelps’ body during the summer Olympics? For many of us, that was the first time we heard anything about cupping. It's a treatment meant to help the connective tissue around muscles called fascia.

Cooling caps for chemotherapy

Apr 1, 2017
faungg's photos/flickr

Chemotherapy is one of the most effective ways of treating cancer, but it has some unfortunate side effect -- like hair loss. And for women, that side effect is frequently the most traumatic.

This week, assistant professor of medicine at the Breast Center at Baylor College of Medicine and director of the Breast Cancer Prevention and High Risk Clinic Dr. Julie Nangia joins “Take Care” to discuss how women undergoing chemotherapy might be able to save their hair by wearing cooling caps.

Chiropractic: What you need to know

Apr 1, 2017
Chiropractic Louisville / Flickr

From Olympic athletes to everyday patients alike, many people are turning to chiropractors to relieve pain and increase joint mobility. With roughly 80 percent of Americans experiencing lower back pain in their lives, it’s no wonder chiropractic has become a popular choice.

To find out more about the practice and how it works, “Take Care” was joined by Dr. Kevin Rindal, chiropractor to the 2016 USA Olympic Swim Team, including gold medal Olympian, Michael Phelps. Rindal specializes in chiropractic spinal and extremity manipulation, soft tissue rehabilitation, and sports injury rehabilitation. He is also the founder and CEO of InHealth, a sports injury and performance facility in Seattle, Washington.

pengrin™ / Flickr

One of the many disturbing side effects of cancer treatment is the hair loss that chemotherapy can cause. A recent clinical trial tested a new device that might help reduce hair loss -- scalp cooling caps. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with the study's lead researcher, Dr. Julie Nangia, an assistant professor of medicine at the Breast Center at Baylor College of Medicine, the director of the Breast Cancer Prevention and High Risk Clinic.

Who's who in the exam room

Mar 25, 2017
Spanish Virtually / Flickr

Have you ever gone into a doctor’s appointment and been left wondering who took your blood pressure? Who asked about that prescription? Chances are you’re not alone.

Sometimes it’s difficult to know who’s who in the exam room. This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Robert Schmerling, associate physician and clinical chief of rheumatology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and associate professor in medicine at Harvard Medical School, talks about this exam room dilemma.

Is asthma being overdiagnosed?

Mar 24, 2017
NIAID / Flickr

The Centers for Disease Control says that 1 in every 13 adults in the U.S. has asthma. But now there's evidence asthma may be overdiagnosed and other conditions are often the cause of a patient's breathing problems. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Shawn Aaron, a professor in the Department of Medicine at the University of Ottawa. His team's recent study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, found that one-third of people diagnosed with asthma do not actually have the disease.

Angelo Benedetto/Flickr

We all know exercise benefits us physically, but could going for a morning jog help prevent most diseases and boost brain function as well?

This week on Take Care, nationally recognized sports medicine physician, bestselling author and fitness instructor Dr. Jordan Metzl discusses the physical and mental benefits exercise has on our bodies.

Sock selection: know your options

Mar 18, 2017
Daniel Max / Flickr

From dressy to athletic, cotton to bamboo, there is a wide selection of socks to choose from nowadays. But with all the brands, varieties, and purposes of these different socks, it can be hard to decide which are right for you. To find out more, “Take Care” spoke with Dr. Victoria Foley, a podiatrist and foot surgeon, who is board certified by the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery, to hear her take on the many socks available on the market.

Should exercise be prescribed by doctors?

Mar 17, 2017
Charlene N Simmons / WRVO News

Most medical researchers agree -- Exercise is good for you. But a recent study shows that most physicians do not have the training or expertise to help their patients make exercise part of their health regime. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Jordan Metzl, a sports medicine physician, about prescribing exercise. Metzl practices at Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City.

Genetics and cancer: why testing can aid prevention

Mar 11, 2017
lorna / Flickr

No one wants to talk about cancer. A disease that has taken the lives of so many, even the word itself has an ominous connotation. But as much as we don’t want to talk about it, new genetic technology suggests that starting the conversation about your family’s cancer history might be in everyone’s best interest.

In her new book, "A Cancer in the Family: Take Control of your Genetic Inheritance," Dr. Theodora Ross addresses how our family’s medical history plays a role in our health. To shed some light on the genetics of cancer, as well as genetic counseling, Ross spoke with “Take Care” to explain the importance of knowing your family history. Ross, a cancer geneticist, is director of University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center’s cancer genetics program.

Should you avoid aspartame?

Mar 11, 2017
Steve Snodgrass / Flickr

The harmful effects sugar can have on the body has been given a lot of attention. Known for sabotaging diets and packing on extra calories, many people try to avoid sugar by seeking out artificial sweeteners as an alternative. But according to a new study by the Harvard Medical School, one common sugar substitute, aspartame, could be sabotaging your diet, too. And ironically enough, it is often used most in “diet” products (diet soda, for example).

To understand more about this study, this week on “Take Care” Dr. Richard Hodin, professor of surgery at Harvard Medical School, discusses the effects of aspartame on the body.

Cancer and your family

Mar 10, 2017

Cancer is a scary word and people are often reluctant to talk about. That can make it difficult to find out about your family history of the disease. And even if you do know that many of your relatives have had cancer, would you get tested for it yourself? This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Theodora Ross, who directs the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center's Cancer Genetics Program.

Shared housing: an option for the elderly

Mar 4, 2017
Skip Kuebel / Flickr

In recent years, the baby boomer generation has seen a rise in shared housing, or a “Golden Girls” style of living, where rather than living alone, elderly people opt for roommates. There are plenty of reasons for older individuals, namely women, to consider living with a roommate or two, and to find out about some of those reasons, “Take Care” spoke with author, journalist, and baby boomer expert Sally Abrahms.

Cold sores and canker sores: What's the difference?

Mar 4, 2017
AJC1 / Flickr

Whether caused by infection, injury, or stress, cold sores and canker sores are a common occurrence for many of us. Undoubtedly, they’re both very irritating, but is there a difference between the two? To find out, “Take Care” spoke with Dr. Mark Burhenne, a tenured dentist and the expert behind the popular website, “Ask the Dentist: Oral Health for Total Wellness.”

Why 'Golden Girls' trend is growing

Mar 3, 2017
MTSOfan / Flickr

Remember the TV comedy "The Golden Girls"? The idea of four single senior women living together may have provided the fictional backdrop for plenty of humor. But in real life, more people are choosing to live with roommates in retirement for serious reasons. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Sally Abrahms, a nationally recognized expert on baby boomers and seniors and an award-winning journalist who has written about this trend.

Matt Madd/Flickr

Having aches or pains, or just feeling stressed? You might want to consider taking up yoga.

This week on Take Care, yoga practitioner, teacher and chief ambassador for Yoga Alliance Andrew Tanner discusses the benefits yoga can have on the mind, body, and maybe even spirit, along with what style of yoga might be best for you.

On the dangers of smoke: first, second and thirdhand

Feb 25, 2017
Tom Sinon / Flickr

Most of us are aware of the harmful effects smoking can have on the body. From heart attacks to lung cancer, there’s no question that smoke inhalation has some nasty consequences.

To find out more about those consequences, Dr. Norman Edelman, senior scientific advisor of the American Lung Association, joined “Take Care” for a conversation on different smoking methods, as well as secondhand and thirdhand smoke.

A closer look at smoking and its effects, in any form

Feb 24, 2017

Research shows that inhaling smoke from cigarettes increases your risk of lung cancer and other disease. But is it the carcinogens found in the tobacco or the smoke itself that causes the increase? Secondhand smoke, which has a different composition, is thought of as equally dangerous. And what about thirdhand smoke that lingers on fabrics and in homes?

This week on "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak to Dr. Norman Edelman about smoking and its effects. Edelman is a senior scientific advisor with the American Lung Association.

Al Case/Flickr

It’s common knowledge that eating sugar does no favors for a body. But is sugar having worse effects than just adding empty calories to our diets?

Award winning investigative science journalist and cofounder of the Nutrition Science Initiative Gary Taubes discusses the detrimental effects that excessive sugar consumption has on people, and how “excessive” may be actually a lot lower than you might think. Taubes is the author of the new book, "The Case Against Sugar."

Making a case against sugar

Feb 17, 2017
Judy van der Velden / via Flickr

Scientific evidence continues to grow about the negative impacts of consuming sugar. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with investigative science journalist Gary Taubes. Taubes is the author of the new book "The Case against Sugar" and argues that sugar is as unhealthy as smoking.

Bedbugs and bacteria: What’s lingering in your linens?

Feb 11, 2017
Marco / Zak/Flickr

When someone checks into a hospital or hotel, the last thing on their mind is the sheets they’re lying on. But those sheets have the potential to be deadly if they aren’t properly washed between patients or guests.

This week on Take Care, Dr. Philip Tierno, Clinical Professor in the Departments of Microbiology and Pathology at the NYU School of Medicine and author of "The Secret Life of Germs: Observations and Lessons from a Microbe Hunter" discusses what might be hiding out in the bedsheets of hospitals and hotels—and the impacts it could have on your health.

The word on cranberries for UTI treatment

Feb 11, 2017
Cheri Neufeld / Flickr

For many a generation, mothers and grandmothers alike have sworn by cranberry juice as a suitable home remedy for urinary tract infections (UTIs).

To understand the science behind this treatment option, Dr. Rose Khavari, assistant professor of urology at the Institute for Academic Medicine at Houston Methodist Hospital, joined “Take Care” for a conversation on UTIs and the effectiveness of cranberry juice and cranberry supplements.

Keeping sheets sanitary & germ-free

Feb 10, 2017
jurek d. / Flickr

There's nothing nicer than clean sheets and towels. But can dirty linens actually be unhealthy? This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Philip Tierno, a microbiologist at the NYU School of Medicine, about how hospitals and hotels should be cleaning their bedsheets -- and what you can catch if they don't. Tierno is also the author of "The Secret Life of Germs: Observations and Lessons from a Microbe Hunter."

Alternative therapies -- safe and effective?

Feb 4, 2017
Jena Al-Awadhi / Flickr

Everyone wants to feel their best, but with so many products on the health market, it can be difficult to know which are truly effective. Today, many medical consumers are turning to alternative medicines and therapies in an effort to increase their overall health and well-being. So which ones are safe, and which actually work?

To find out, “Take Care” spoke with Dr. Josephine Briggs, director of the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. A Harvard and Yale-trained physician, Briggs researches and reports on various therapies to provide the public with the information necessary to decide whether a certain practice is beneficial.

Getting your calcium – dairy vs. dietary supplements

Feb 4, 2017
Guy Montag/Flickr

Calcium is essential for healthy bones, but could getting it from supplements be doing more harm than good?

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Taylor Wallace, affiliate professor in the department of Nutrition and Food Studies at George Mason University and former senior director of science, policy and government relations at the National Osteoporosis Foundation, discusses the effects that taking calcium supplements could have on cardiovascular health.

Calcium supplement controversy

Feb 3, 2017
Catherine Loper / WRVO News

Many people try to increase their consumption of calcium to help prevent osteoperosis. But there has been some research that indicates that calcium supplements could increase the risk of heart disease. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Taylor Wallace, a professor in nutrition and food studies at George Mason University, about the controversy over calcium supplements. Wallace is also the former senior director of science policy and government relations at the National Osteoporosis Foundation.

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