Take Care

Staying safe when lightning strikes

Jul 23, 2016
Andreas Øverland / Flickr

When we think of something with low odds, like winning the lottery, we might compare it to getting struck by lightning. However, the chances of getting struck by lightning may be higher than you think.

There is actually a one-in-12,000 chance this could happen in your lifetime, according to the National Weather Service. This week on “Take Care,” lightning expert John Jensenius tells us what we need to know about lightning and how to stay safe when it strikes. Jensenius is a meteorologist and lightning safety specialist with the National Weather Service and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Tim Sandle / Flickr

Donating blood and organs, if possible, is encouraged in the medical world to save lives. But recently, medical professionals may also be looking for a new type of donor—fecal.

Suffering economy causes stress in college graduates

Jul 16, 2016
Shilad Sen / Flickr

For generations kids have been told that if they work hard in school, they’ll get a good job. But this doesn’t seem to be so simple for the millennial generation, as there just aren’t enough jobs in the current economy to go around.

Little berries are big super food

Jul 16, 2016
Min Liu / Flickr

Whether you buy them fresh or frozen, pick them off the bush or grow them yourself, berries are one of the best foods to have in the house. They’re tasty and, nutrition-wise, pack a big punch for such a small food.

Rachel.Adams / Flickr

The millennial generation is experiencing high levels of stress over work and career. Large student loans, difficulty finding a job after college and the new economy are causing mental health issues for a growing number of younger people. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," Hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Vinita Mehta, a clinical psychologist and journalist about this increase in anxiety among millennials.

Exercise intensity may affect your mood

Jul 9, 2016
eltpics / Flickr

For many years research has proven just how much daily exercise can improve our overall health. But even with this information, some of us still dread exercise and can’t get past the idea of the sweating, aching, and tiredness it can make us feel.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Paddy Ekkekakis explains why some of us may feel this way toward exercise more than others. Ekkekakis is a professor at Iowa State University and has been researching pleasure and displeasure responses resulting from exercise and physical activity for the past 25 years. His current focus is on the psycho-biological mechanism of the sense of fatigue, and reasons for avoiding physical activity.

How to keep your feet healthy this summer

Jul 9, 2016
Kaylyn Izzo / WRVO

You've kept them bound up and under wraps all winter, and now your feet want to get out and enjoy the sun just like you do. But with more exposure comes more possibility for injury and infection.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Neal Blitz shares with us how to keep our feet healthy this summer. Blitz is a reconstructive foot and ankle surgeon, and the creator of the Bunionplasty bunion surgery procedure. He is also a fellow of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons, and maintains a private practice in New York City.

Fit Approach / Flickr

Medical experts agree that exercise can help prevent a variety of diseases and disorders and is generally good for you. But exercising does not put everyone in a good mood. This week WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care" takes a look at the relationship between mood and exercise in an interview with Paddy Ekkekakis of Iowa State University. Ekkekakis has researched how exercise causes pleasure and displeasure.

The dangers of sun exposure and melanoma

Jun 25, 2016
Sunny_mjx / Flickr

A day on the lake, an afternoon of yard work, watching a baseball game; these are all events that can put us in direct sunlight. But with a 200 percent increase in melanoma diagnoses since the 1970s, we may need to take more precaution when it comes to the sun.

Fortunately, there have been improvements in diagnosis and treatment over the past few decades.This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Lynn Schuchter explains the rise in melanoma and gives us the latest on treatment and prevention. Schuchter is the medicine division chief of hematology-oncology at Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania.  She also leads the melanoma program at the university, and is a professor of hematology-oncology.

Things to keep in mind when grilling this summer

Jun 25, 2016
Tojosan / Flickr

Nothing beats the taste of flame grilled food in the summertime. But there are some things to keep in mind in terms of safety when using the grill.

This week on “Take Care,” food safety expert Benjamin Chapman tells us what we need to know. Chapman is an associate professor and food safety extension specialist at North Carolina State University. He's also the co-host of the podcast “Food Safety Talk.”

Why sustainability should be incorporated into our diets

Jun 18, 2016
Aleksandra B. / Flickr

When we think about healthy eating, many of us view it in regards to our personal health. However, we may need to view it in terms of a healthy environment as well.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Walter Willett tells us the dangers industrially producing food can have on the environment, and why a sustainable diet should become a necessity. Willett is the chair of the nutrition department at Harvard University School of Public Health, and the Fredrick John Stare professor of epidemiology and nutrition. He is also the chair of the Scientific and Technical Advisory Council of the annual Menus of Change leadership summit, which analyzes issues involving public health, the environment, and the food industry.

What you need to know about latex allergy

Jun 18, 2016
Victor BS / Flickr

There are many things a person can be allergic to. However, an uncommon, but serious allergy that can sometimes be overlooked is latex.

A latex allergy can cause severe discomfort, and in extreme cases death. To explain this allergy on “Take Care” this week, is Dr. Neeta Ogden. Ogden is an adult and pediatric allergist, asthma specialist and immunologist in private practice in New York City. She is also a spokesperson for the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

The pharmacist's role and what it takes to become one

Jun 11, 2016
Mike Mozart / Flickr

They wear a white lab coat, but aren’t your typical doctor. They work behind a counter, but they don’t serve you food. A pharmacist fills your prescriptions and makes sure they are safe for you. But how do they earn their white lab coat and spot behind the counter?

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Elizabeth Higdon tells us what it means to be a pharmacist. Higdon is an instructor in the department of pharmacy practice at Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences campus in Colchester, Vermont. She also holds a doctor of pharmacy degree, teaches classes on over-the-counter medications, and works as a community pharmacist.

Steps to a successful herb garden

Jun 11, 2016
Kaylyn Izzo

If you’re not big on gardening, but still want to add a fresh taste to every dish, an herb garden may be something to consider.

This week on “Take Care,” gardening expert, Amy Jeanroy tells us how to make this simple, yet useful, garden a success. Jeanroy covers herb gardening for the how-to website About.com, and has operated a family greenhouse business for the past 15 years. She is also the author of ”Canning and Preserving for Dummies,” which is now in its second edition.

A pharmacist's role in your health care

Jun 10, 2016
NVinacco / Flickr

Many of us rely on pharmacists for nothing more than filling a prescription. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Elizabeth Higdon, an instructor with the Department of Pharmacy Practice at Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, about the role pharmacists can play as part of your health care team.

Keeping tennis & golf injury free this summer

Jun 4, 2016
Torrey Wiley / Flickr

Summer is approaching, and with the nicer weather, you may become more active by breaking out those golf clubs and tennis rackets. However, you could be one swing away from an elbow, wrist, or hand injury if you don't take the proper precautions.

This week on "Take Care," Dr. John Fatti tells us how these injuries can happen, and what to do to avoid them. Fatti is an orthopedic surgeon who specializes in hand, wrist and elbow injuries, and he is the president of SOS -- Syracuse Orthopedic Specialists --in Syracuse, NY.

When foods sound healthy, but aren't

Jun 4, 2016
EvelynGiggles / Flickr

If you grocery shop with a healthy diet in mind, the labels “fat-free” and “sugar-free” may jump out to you. However, these foods may not be as healthy as their labels make them sound.

Many fat-free and sugar-free foods have little nutritional value, and contain additives and artificial ingredients, according to this week’s “Take Care” guest, Kerri-Ann Jennings. Jennings is a registered dietician and the former editor of Eating Well Magazine. She also writes for Yoga Journal, Men's Health, the Huffington Post, and Cooking Channel TV. Her article "8 Healthy-Sounding Foods That Aren't," appears on the Food Network website.

david__jones / Flickr

The immune system generally keeps you healthy, but there are times when these biological processes can actually harm you. Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease -- which arises when the immune system mistakenly attacks its own bodily tissues.

This week, on “Take Care,” Dr. Robert Shmerling explains the symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Shmerling is clinical chief of the rheumatology division of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and a senior editor of internet publishing at Harvard Health Publications.

Leah Landry / WRVO

Over the last several decades, microwave ovens have become a standard kitchen appliance in many American homes. But for some, doubts remain about their safety and impact on the nutritional value of food cooked in them.

This week on “Take Care,” food scientist Don Schaffner takes us behind the microwave door to explain how microwave ovens work, and the ways this kind of cooking technology interacts with food. Schaffner is an extension specialist in food science and distinguished professor at Rutgers University. He is a world-renowned expert on food safety and protection and is the co-host of a podcast on microbial food safety.

Science & safety of microwave cooking

May 20, 2016
HomeSpot HQ / Flickr

Microwave ovens have become a staple in American kitchens. But many people do not understand the science behind how they cook food. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Don Schaffner, a food scientist and professor at Rutgers University, about how microwaves work and whether or not they are really safe.

Pseph / Flickr

It’s a difficult fact to swallow -- Americans are heavier than ever. For a number of decades, we’ve been told that dietary fat was unhealthy and eating fat would make us gain weight. Fat equals fat, right? Our guest this week explains that the equation is not that simple. The tide is turning on fat.

Dr. Mark Hyman is a physician, a nine-time New York Times bestselling author, and director of the Cleveland Clinic Center for Functional Medicine. His latest book is “Eat Fat, Get Thin,” and that’s what he believes -- we can add fats back into our diet (keeping in mind that not all fats are created equal) and stay healthy. Hyman is the founder and medical director of The UltraWellness Center, a medical editor at The Huffington Post, and has been a regular medical contributor to CBS This Morning and The Today Show.

Pictures of Money / Flickr

To many adults, having health insurance is a no-brainer. It’s something you just have to have. And now under the Affordable Care Act, it’s required to have medical insurance, or pay a penalty. Even under the new law, the age group that’s the least likely to get insurance, is the healthiest.

This week on “Take Care,” Kevin Counihan, the CEO of healthcare.gov explains all the various options young people have to get insured. Healthcare.gov is the federal government’s marketplace exchange to buy health insurance.

Insuring young adults

May 13, 2016
baasiilb15 / Flickr

 

More young adults go without health insurance than any other age group. The Affordable Care Act made it possible for anyone up to age 26 to stay on his or her parent’s medical insurance. But how exactly does that work? This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Kevin Counihan, the CEO of healthcare.gov, the federal government's health care exchange.

Divorce later in life becoming more common

May 7, 2016
Edwin & Kelly Tofslie / Flickr

Over the last 10 years, divorce rates have been steadying in the U.S., with the exception of one age group.

This week on “Take Care,” journalist Abby Ellin tells us why, more and more, older couples seem to be splitting up. Ellin is a frequent contributor to The New York Times, and her work has also appeared in Time magazine and the Village Voice. Ellin's article, "After Full Lives Together, More Older Couples Are Divorcing," appeared in The New York Times last October.

Sam Howzit / Flickr

We’ve probably all seen a commercial at some point for medication to help a weak bladder, but it isn’t something we generally want to talk about if we have one.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Jenni Johnson Gabelsberg explains this problem, known as urinary incontinence, and how to fix it through physical therapy. Gabelsberg is a nationally prominent physical therapist whose focus is on pelvic floor rehabilitation. She has a doctor of physical therapy degree, and lectures widely on evaluation and treatment for female and male pelvic floor dysfunctions, such as urinary and fecal incontinence.

Good footing: The importance of knowing your type

Apr 30, 2016
myllissa / Flickr

Putting one foot in front of the other can seem like a pretty simple task. But there is actually a lot that goes into this, as the foot is one of the most complex structures of the human body.

There are 26 bones, 33 joints, and more than 100 muscles, tendons, and ligaments that connect to the foot and make it function, according to this week’s “Take Care” guest, podiatrist Dr. Neal Blitz. Blitz is a reconstructive foot and ankle surgeon, the creator of the bunionplasty bunion surgery procedure, and a fellow of the American College of Foot & Ankle Surgeons.

How to keep your memory from reflecting your age

Apr 30, 2016
A Health Blog / Flickr

As you get older you may start to realize your memory isn’t as good as it once was. You have no problem recalling something that happened five years ago, but for the life of you can’t remember the name of the person’s hand you just shook five minutes ago.

This week on “Take Care,” brain health and memory expert Dr. Cynthia Green, revisits us to explain why this is, and what we can do to improve it. Green is an assistant clinical professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, and is the founder of Total Brain Health. In addition, Green is also a leading authority in the diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.

Keeping your memory sharp

Apr 29, 2016

As we age, many of us may find that our memory is not what it used to be. But is there anything we can do to change that? This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Cynthia Green, a psychiatrist at Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, and an expert on brain health and Alzheimer’s disease. They discuss ways to keep your mental edge.

Does brain age affect memory?

Apr 23, 2016
dierk schaefer / Flickr

As we age so does our brain, which often means memory loss and forgetfulness. But just in the way we exercise to keep our bodies healthy, there are exercises we can do to maintain our brain’s health and memory.

This week on “Take Care,” memory fitness and brain health expert Dr. Cynthia Green shares how we can do this. Green is an assistant clinical professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, and the founder and president of Memory Arts, which provides memory fitness and brain health training. She is also a leading authority in the diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.

Jamie / Flickr

Most of us have had to take prescription medication at some point in our lives. How to take the medication is usually described on the label, but proper storage and disposal often isn’t.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Elizabeth Higdon discusses how to store and dispose of medicine in order to keep it potent, and safe from harming others and the environment. Higdon is an instructor at the Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences campus in Colchester, Vermont, teaches classes on over-the-counter medications, and works as a community pharmacist.

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