Take Care

DCIS and what it means for women's health

Nov 22, 2015
dbkfrog / Flickr

Everyone is aware of breast cancer, but not everyone knows much about the various kinds of breast cancer. DCIS, or ductal carcinoma in situ, is a non-invasive type of breast cancer which may or may not become invasive breast cancer. This week on “Take Care,” we focus on DCIS with Dr. Tari A. King.

Dr. Tari A. King is Chief of Breast Surgery at the Dana Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center and the associate division chief for breast surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

Talking turkey about labels this Thanksgiving

Nov 22, 2015
wiphy / Flickr

With the holidays approaching, turkey is at the top of many shopping lists. A trip to the grocery store can be overwhelming with so many different options including organic, free-range and hormone-free meats. This week on “Take Care,” we discuss what these terms mean with Susan Moores.

Susan Moores is a registered dietitian and former national spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association. Moores has also written for the Wall Street Journal and MSNBC and covers healthy eating at her website SusanMoores.com.

DCIS: One of the most common forms of breast cancer

Nov 20, 2015
pixel displays / Flickr

One in five women diagnosed with breast cancer will be told she has DCIS, ductal carcinoma in situ. This Sunday, on WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Tari King, chief of breast surgery at the Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center and the associate division chief for breast surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, about what DCIS is and how it differs from other kinds of breast cancer.

More of this interview can be heard on "Take Care," WRVO's health and wellness show this Sunday at 6:30 p.m.

Think food allergies are just for kids? Think again

Nov 15, 2015
Brooke Bina / Flickr

While food allergies are most common in babies and young children, adults are also susceptible. This week on “Take Care,” we discuss food allergies with Dr. Neeta Ogden.

Dr. Neeta Ogden is an adult and pediatric allergist and immunologist in private practice in New York City, as well as a spokesperson for the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

A common problem no one wants to talk about: hemorrhoids

Nov 15, 2015
Sid Sowder / Flickr

Hemorrhoids are a condition that nobody wants to talk about, but that more than half of all Americans will experience in their lifetime. This week on “Take Care,” we get to the bottom of hemorrhoids with Dr. Rajeev Jain.

Dr. Rajeev Jain is a partner at Texas Digestive Disease Consultants, chief of gastroenterology at Texas Health Dallas and clinical assistant professor of medicine at University of Texas Southwestern Medical School.

Food allergy or intolerance?

Nov 13, 2015
Steven Depolo / Flickr

There's a lot more attention on food allergies these days. But what's the difference between an allergy and a food intolerance? And can you grow out of or develop new food allergies as you age? This Sunday, on WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen ask Dr. Neeta Ogden these questions. Ogden is an allergist and spokesperson for the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

Challenging conventional wisdom about growing old

Nov 8, 2015
ChangingAging.org / Flickr

As Baby Boomers continue to age, more and more are reaching the retirement age. This week on “Take Care,” we discuss aging and how attitudes toward aging can be changed with Dr. Bill Thomas.

Dr. Bill Thomas is co-founder of The Eden Alternative, an international non-profit organization focused on creating quality of life for elders and their care partners. He is a physician, an international authority on geriatric medicine and eldercare and an award-winning author.

The benefits of beans

Nov 8, 2015
Johannah Sakimura

Beans are a staple of many countries because of their protein and affordability. This week on “Take Care,” we discuss the health benefits of beans and why you should be adding them to your diet with Johannah Sakimura.

Johannah Sakimura is a registered dietician who writes the Nutrition Sleuth column at Everyday Health. She has a master’s degree in nutrition from the Columbia University Institute of Human Nutrition.

Retiring old perceptions about aging

Nov 6, 2015
MTSOfan / Flickr

As the influential baby boomer generation gets older, they are reinventing what it means to be a senior citizen. But much of American society views being elderly negatively. This Sunday, on WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Bill Thomas, a physician, author and expert on eldercare about changing this perception.


Health impacts of agricultural pesticides

Nov 1, 2015
Patrick Feller / Flickr

Many consumers have become concerned with the health impacts of ingesting residual pesticides used to protect fruit and vegetable. This week on “Take Care,” we talk with Dr. Dave Stone about the health implications of agricultural pesticides.

Dr. Dave Stone is a toxicologist and director of the National Pesticide Information Center, a cooperative effort between Oregon State University and the Environmental Protection Agency.

Ringing in the ears? It could be tinnitus

Nov 1, 2015
Simon James / Flickr

Many people experience noise or ringing in the head or ears called tinnitus, but what happens when this noise impacts our daily lives? This week on “Take Care,” we discuss tinnitus with Dr. Tammy Kordas.

Dr. Tammy Kordas is an audiologist and clinical instructor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Syracuse University. Dr. Kordas is also a supervising audiologist at the Gebbie Speech Language Hearing Clinic at Syracuse University.

Pesticides & produce -- health risk?

Oct 30, 2015
rick / Flickr

Many consumers are concerned about the pesticides used on commercially grown fruit and vegetables. But do the pesticides on produce really cause any health problems? This Sunday, on WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen get the answer from Dave Stone, a toxicologist and director of the National Pesticide Information Center.

More of this interview can be heard on "Take Care," WRVO's health and wellness show Sunday at 6:30 p.m.  Support for this story comes from the Health Foundation for Western and Central New York.

Does age have to bring difficulty seeing at night?

Oct 25, 2015
Nieri Da Silva / Flickr

Many people notice as they get older, they have a little more trouble seeing at night. But what causes this issue and can anything be done about it?

This week on “Take Care,” we interview Dr. Mark Blecher, an ophthalmologist, eye surgeon, and co-director of the Cataract Service and Primary Eye Care Service at Wills Eye Hospital in Philadelphia.

Fall time change and its impact on sleep

Oct 25, 2015
Douglas Heriot / Flickr

Sleep is key to maintaining good health, but what happens to the human sleep cycle when the clocks change in the fall?

This week on “Take Care,” we discuss the effects of fall time change on sleep. Dr. Lois Krahn is a psychiatrist and sleep researcher at the Mayo Clinic Sleep Disorder Center in Arizona.

Guilherme Tavares / Flickr

In just over a week, daylight saving time will end. But some people find it hard to adjust to the annual ritual of turning the clock back. This Sunday on WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Lois Krahn, a psychiatrist at the Mayo Clinic's Sleep Disorders Center in Arizona about how not to lose sleep over the time change.

Alex Proimos / flickr

As the United States experiences a doctor shortage, more patients are seeing nurse practitioners and physician assistants for the diagnosis of routine ailments.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Atul Grover discusses the differences between nurse practitioners and physician assistants. Grover is chief public policy officer of the Association of American Medical Colleges.

Rich Bowen / flickr

As fall approaches, you might think of orange and red leaves falling from trees. As you visit the grocery store or farmer’s market, remember the edible seasonal foliage that comes in the form of colorful produce and is packed with vitamins and nutrients.

This week on “Take Care,” Johannah Sakimura discusses the best fall vegetable choices. Sakimura has a master’s degree in nutrition from the Columbia University Institute of Human Nutrition and writes the Sleuth column at Everyday Health.

Increasingly, Americans do not see an actual doctor when they have an appointment at the doctor's office. Instead, nurse practitioners and physician assistants are often the ones performing routine treatment and diagnosis. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Atul Grover, chief public policy officer of the Association of American Medical Colleges about what NPs and PAs are allowed to do and how they are trained.

The ins, outs and noises of MRI machines

Oct 11, 2015
Karin Beil / Flickr

MRI machines can be a tremendous help when it comes to visualizing specific areas of the body that other imaging tools just can’t capture. But how do these gigantic machines work, and what’s with that loud banging noise?

This week on “Take Care,” we talk about these magnetic resonance imaging machines with Dr. Scott Buckingham, a radiologist with CRA Medical Imaging in Syracuse, NY.

Theraputic massage relieves pain one muscle at a time

Oct 11, 2015
flattrcom / Flickr

Muscles, tendons and ligaments can be a source of a lot of pain yet they fail to show up in diagnostic tests, like x-rays.

This week on “Take Care,” Tracy Segall, the lead licensed massage therapist at the Cleveland Clinic’s Center for Integrative and Lifestyle Medicine, talks about the benefits of massage therapy and how it can heal those “hidden” aches and pains.

The MRI, or magnetic resonance imaging, has become an increasingly used diagnostic tool. But, some patients are quite apprehensive about having this test. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Scott Buckingham, a Syracuse radiologist, about the advances in MRIs and their use -- and how to cope with the test if you're claustrophobic.

Matthew / Flickr

Over the last several decades, Americans have been searching for the ultimate diet that will result in the greatest weight loss for everyone. Low-carbohydrate diets are currently among the most popular, with proponents saying they are the ticket to losing weight. But how do low-carb diets actually compare to low-fat diets?

This week on “Take Care,” we interview a researcher who studied that very question. Kevin Hall is a senior investigator at the National Institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Diseases, one of the National Institutes of Health. His main research interests are the regulation of food intake, macronutrient metabolism, energy balance, and body weight.

A healthy night's sleep starts with a healthy mattress

Oct 4, 2015
Flashy Soup Can / Flickr

Doctors do not prescribe mattresses, yet they can be the cause of countless aches and pains. Mattresses are important but what goes into choosing the right one?

This week on “Take Care,” Ed Perratore, senior editor for Consumer Reports, looks at how the right mattress can make all the difference.

Low-carb vs. low-fat: which diet works better?

Oct 2, 2015

Low-carb diets are currently very popular, and have been extolled for everything from helping lose weight to preventing disease. One group of scientists decided to test a low-carb diet head-to-head with a low fat diet to see which one caused dieters to lose more body fat. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with the leader of the study, Kevin Hall, a senior investigator at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, which is part of the National Institutes of Health.

Jon Curnow / Flickr

Have you tried to make a change in your life to better your health and failed? You’re not alone. Whether it’s changing your diet, exercising more, or quitting smoking, one expert says it’s probably because you’re not using something called “design thinking.”

This week on “Take Care,” we interview Dr. Kyra Bobinet. She discussed how design thinking can revolutionize the way you go about making changes in your life in her just-released book, “Well-Designed Life: 10 Lessons in Brain Science & Design Thinking for a Mindful, Healthy, & Purposeful Life.”

What to do about dandruff

Sep 27, 2015
Joseph Tame / Flickr

While it may not be a health issue, it may be a serious embarrassment. Dandruff can make its way from your scalp to your shoulders  in what seems like seconds after you shower.  How can you make those flakes go away?

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Emmy Graber joins us with her recommendations for getting rid of dandruff. Graber is director of the Dermatology Institute of Boston.

Designing how you change your life

Sep 25, 2015

If you're trying to make a change regarding your health -- like quitting smoking or altering your diet -- any of us go all-in and try to immediately adjust our behavior all at once. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Kyra Bobinet, a physician and scientist who has authored the just-released book, “Well-Designed Life: 10 Lessons in Brain Science & Design Thinking for a Mindful, Healthy, & Purposeful Life.” They discuss how using the concept of design can help us be successful and making changes.

The art of seeking a second opinion

Sep 20, 2015
Alex E. Proimos / Flickr

Seeking a second medical opinion can be an awkward process. No one wants hurt feelings but everyone wants what is best for them.

This week on “Take Care,” Erin Singleton, the chief of mission delivery at the Patient Advocate Foundation, addresses the importance of seeking a second medical opinion.

R. Nial Bradshaw / Flickr

Many people think a headache is not a big deal, and they can just tough it out. But experts say that's not always the best idea.

This week on "Take Care," we talk to Dr. Mark Green, director of the Center for Headache and Pain Medicine and professor of neurology and anesthesiology at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine.  Green discusses the different types of headaches, how to treat them, and debunks some headache myths.

Seeking a second opinion

Sep 18, 2015

When you or a loved one receives a diagnosis and a doctor is urging you to act quickly, your first instinct might be to just do it. Then someone suggests that perhaps a second opinion might be a good idea. But that may seem like it's easier said than done. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Erin Singleton, chief of mission delivery of the nonprofit Patient Advocate Foundation, about when to seek a second opinion and how to go about getting one.

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