Wendy Long

Columbia City Blog / Flickr

New York is poised to elect Hillary Clinton for president and give Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY) a fourth term, but down-ballot races for Congress and state Senate are less certain.

kristen_a / Flickr

A final poll in the long presidential race shows the contest tightening a bit in New York state, though Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton still leads Republican Donald Trump by double digits.

Siena College spokesman Steve Greenberg says while Clinton is still 17 points ahead of Trump in New York state, she’s lost ground in the past few weeks among independents.

He says Clinton and Trump are now tied among independents in the downstate suburbs.

NY Times/Nathaniel Brooks

Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY), in the only debate with his opponent, said he’s “appalled” by FBI director James Comey’s actions, including  the decision announced Friday to re- examine emails from Hillary Clinton’s top aide for evidence of misuse of classified materials.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News File Photo

It looks like Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY) will be re-elected to a fourth term on Nov. 8, barring any major turn of events. He’s about 40 points ahead of his nearest opponent in the polls and the bigger question now is: will Schumer be the next Senate minority leader or majority leader?

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News File Photo

With less than three weeks before Election Day, Hillary Clinton is even further ahead of Donald Trump in New York state, and that could affect downballot races, including seats for the state Senate.

Clinton is 24 points ahead of Trump, at 54 percent to 30 percent, a jump from when Siena College did a survey in September. Spokesman Steve Greenberg said the biggest change is independents moving over to the Democratic presidential candidate’s camp. A two-point lead among independents for Clinton has grown to a 17-point lead.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

The Libertarian Party is trying to make a name this political season, which has disaffected some voters from the major political parties. Alex Merced believes a Libertarian option gives him an edge in a race against incumbent Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY).

Merced jumped in the race against Schumer in what he calls a “weird political year.” And he points to the ease of getting signatures to get on the ballot as a sign that this year will work to his advantage.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

Wendy Long, the Republican candidate for Senate running against Sen. Charles Schumer, faces great odds in her campaign against the powerful and popular third-term senator. Long made her case when she addressed the New York delegation to the Republican National Convention Tuesday.

It’s the second time that Wendy Long is running for Senate. She lost to incumbent Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand four years ago, by 46 points, the largest margin of defeat for any statewide candidate in New York, ever.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Republican Wendy Long is taking another shot at running for U.S. Senate in New York state. The conservative lawyer from New York City lost a race against Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand four years ago in a landslide. This year, she’s taking on the man who could become the next Democratic Party leader in the Senate, Charles Schumer.

A new poll finds that Democrat incumbent Senator Kirsten Gillibrand is poised for a record breaking win on election day, with a more than 40-point lead over Republican challenger Wendy Long.

Voters got their only chance to watch the candidates for U.S. Senate from New York State debate last night.  The two candidates tangled  on issues ranging from abortion to hydrofracking.

The Republican candidate challenging Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, Wendy Long, is urging swift action on hydrofracking in New York.

Senate candidate says fracking delay is unnecessary

Oct 4, 2012

U.S. Senate candidate Wendy Long is accusing her opponent of not supporting natural gas drilling, which she says would create jobs in New York. Long, a Republican, held a press conference Wednesday in Syracuse to blame Senator Kirsten Gillibrand of delaying its approval.

The contest for the one U.S. Senate seat from New York that is up for grabs starts in full force after Labor Day. And, for the first time ever, two women are pitted against each other in a statewide race. A Republican political unknown faces the Democrat chosen to fill the shoes of Hillary Clinton when she became Secretary of State. The two candidates visited the New York State Fair last week, admitting their names may still be unknown to many New Yorkers.

Karen Dewitt / WRVO News File Photo

The Republican candidate for US Senate, Wendy Long, is describing herself as pro-hydrofracking, for entitlement reform and focused on beating her opponent. Long spoke with reporters in Albany Monday and talked about everything from Paul Ryan to tort reform.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

Republican Senate candidate Wendy Long is challenging Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand's (D-NY) fiscal record.

Long stopped in Syracuse this afternoon on an upstate New York campaign swing.

Taxpayers in New York are sending too much money to Washington, Long contends.

Colia Clark / coliaclark.org

Not many New Yorkers likely know that three women are running for U.S. Senate in November.

Colia Clark is a veteran of the civil rights movement, and a former Democrat. Now she is a Green Party candidate running for Senate against incumbent Democrat Senator Kirsten Gillibrand and Republican Wendy Long.

With a little more than a month to go before the Republican primary for U.S. Senate, recent polls show the three candidates vying for a chance to face Senator Kirsten Gillibrand in the general election aren't well known, especially upstate.

One of those candidates is trying to change that.

Nassau County Comptroller George Maragos is well known on Long Island; Congressman Bob Turner has a natural base in New York City; that leaves attorney Wendy Long with the rest of the state.

The Republican candidate for U.S. Senate in New York State is taking on tax reform. Wendy Long used a tax-preparing site in Syracuse to make her point.